Showing posts with label home improvement. Show all posts
Showing posts with label home improvement. Show all posts

Sunday, July 7, 2019

A Quick Review of Unique Ways to Add Value to Your Home

Unique Ways to Add Value to Your Home

If you're a fan of extreme home décor, you'll want to take a look at the professional designs featured below. There's a link to each in points 1, 2 and 3.

You can hire a decorator or use these designs to inspire your DIY side. Visit each of the three featured professional designs to view the architecture, color combinations and accessories.

1. Professionally Designed Baby Rooms with a Nautical Theme

If you love the crisp, fresh and airy feel of nautical décor, you'll appreciate these four creative designs. One features a boat shaped crib, while the others utilize the walls and floors for the greatest impact. The fourth baby room has a partial seafoam colored wall and soft rustic wood floors. It's my favorite. The space is open, airy and cheerful. The few pops of color use carefully positioned accessories. Check out the baby room designs here.

2. Design an Indoor Playhouse Using the Area Under a Staircase

Whether the staircase is on the main or lower level, that unused area can serve a purpose. Some of the playhouse designs featured at the link below are over-the-top, but they make an excellent addition to the higher use and value of the home itself. If you're lucky enough to know a handy person, use these ideas to inspire your own unique under-the-stairs design. If a playroom isn't practical, design the area for storage, a closet, or a pet house.  Check out the staircase playhouse designs here.

3. Add a Dog Washing/Cleaning Station to Your Home

This particular design will require a renovation. If you're planning to make structural changes to your home consider a dog washing or cleaning station. Some of the designs are extremely elaborate while others are as easy as removing the laundry sink and replacing it with a walk-in or walk-up mini shower. A dog washing station, which also serves other purposes, will add value to your home and best of all is a perk most houses don't have. You'll separate yourself from the crowd with this particular addition. Take a look at several pet washing stations here.

Features in a Home that Buyers Prefer

Home Buyer Must Haves
The above suggestions qualify as perks. Adding any one of them can help to generate a quicker and/or higher price.

Most sellers understand a home must be prepped for sale with neutral color tones. However, neutral doesn't mean lacking in texture and distinctive elements. To secure the undivided attention of a potential buyer, don't hesitate to add textured walls, wainscoting, unique storage ideas, feature walls, or, money permitting, some of the above perks.

If you're renovating before selling, Extraspace.com lists 15 features buyers prefer.

You're more than likely familiar with most of their suggestions; hardwood floors, open concepts, modern kitchens and finished basements.

However, they mention a few less standard ideas such as a full bathroom on the main level and flexible rooms (rooms left to the discretion of the buyer). A full bathroom on the main level is a tremendous idea especially in combination with a main floor guest room. With an aging population and multi-family living, a home with this feature can appeal to several demographics.

Your home is your sanctuary until you decide to sell. You can always change the colors, but it's difficult to change the layout. When renovating, think ahead and renovate wisely.








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Thursday, March 21, 2019

DIY Pallet Book Nook - Part One

Pallet Wood Feature Wall and Window Seat
When I purchased my current country home, many of the features that most appealed to me were the quirky, whimsical touches that made it so unlike all of the other cookie-cutter properties.  After moving in, though, I discovered a few things that were just a little too different for my taste.  Still, in renovating those oddities, I wanted to remain true to what had drawn me to this house in the first place: the use of character wood (weathered wood that captures your imagination).

In today's post, I am sharing part one of a two-part series focused on creating a DIY pallet book nook from a previously unused space in my upstairs bedroom.  We will start with the woodworking elements of the project and then finish with handcrafted decorating touches (a homemade cushion, pillows, rug, and other decor to cozy up the space).

Because I have poured so much of myself into my master bedroom renovations, it has become my favorite room in the entire house.  One last improvement remained to make this space visually and functionally cohesive.  There was a funky "hallway" in the room that housed my exercise bike (because it didn't lend itself to much else).  The thing that really bugged me about that long, narrow space was a weird, uneven application of drywall.  I couldn't knock that wall down because it housed my closet and was most likely structural (helping support the roof).  And, hanging, mudding, texturizing, and painting new sheetrock just wasn't on my bucket list.  Been there, done that.  Not my idea of a good time.  So, what to do?

Funky Drywall Before Renovation
Recycled pallets are the answer to most of the truly pressing needs in my world.  Seriously.  Pallet wood can right most wrongs.  It just requires a little—well, okay, a lot—of elbow grease.  I'm good with that.  The finished product has always proven worth it.  We'll just skip over the less than scintillating details of finding, hauling, deconstructing (pulling a massive number of ornery nails), and refinishing (cutting, sizing, planing, and sanding) a tall pile of pallets.  On to step eight.

Tape Marks Studs Where Planks Will Be Nailed
With the feature wall pallet planks ready for installation, I prepped the wall by finding and marking the studs.

Leveling Wall Sections With Lath
Next, I applied thin strips of wood lath to level the two sections of drywall, which will provide a more solid backing when nailing in the pallet planks.  The wainscoting pictured above consists of three framed pieces of corrugated metal topped by a chair rail.  It provides a nice contrasting texture, as well as adding a reflective surface to lighten up the space.

Oh the Tales This Wall Could Tell
When I nailed in the rows of pallet wood, I decided to alternate different widths and colors.  I left all of the wood in its natural state, as the original saw blade marks, nail holes, knots, and checking is what adds personality.  As I started working on this step, I got the inspiration to separate rows of planks with horizontally placed strips of recycled lath removed from inside the plaster walls of an old ranch house.  The definition of the chiseled edges of lath created an effect similar to the chinking seen between bricks.  Really, though, it is the history of that lath, and the story it tells, that adds so much value and interest to the feature wall.

Rustic Pallet Window Seat 
No book nook would be complete without a window seat.  Again, I used rustic pallet parts, purposely choosing planks with nail streaks, and then trimming the bench with pallet skids.  Where there was fresh wood from making the cuts, I applied chalkboard spray paint, and then sanded off most of it to blend the color with that of the naturally weathered surfaces.

Books Feed and Seed the Mind
Above the window, I created a decorative king post truss trim that matches the actual support truss on the front of my house.  I like the way it ties everything together.  While working on this truss, I happened to find the metal  Feed & Seed sign at Tractor Supply Co.  It seemed like the perfect message for my new space, as books certainly do feed and seed our minds.  When I got home with the sign, I was amazed that it fit exactly in place between the truss and the window.  That never happens.  I knew then that it was meant to be.

My Nook is Ready for Accessorizing
With the construction work done, I am now in the process of accessorizing my new nook.  I have selected fabrics and will soon start sewing the window seat cushion and pillows.  Stay tuned for part two of this DIY series when I post the final reveal.  So, what do you think?  Could you see yourself curled up with a book in this sunny space?













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Thursday, March 17, 2016

Best Cleaning Cloth? The Ultimate Cloth

Use the Ultimate Cloth to dust and clean the TV and other electronics
Use an Ultimate Cloth to safely dust and clean
the TV and other electronic devices.
Time for housework? Weekend chores? Spring cleaning? If you dread cleaning house, perhaps you're not using the right tools. Because I believe no one should hate housework, I decided to share this review and personal testimonial about one of my very favorite cleaning tools, the best cleaning cloth I've ever used, the Ultimate Cloth.

You've heard of microfiber, I'm sure. As great as a microfiber cloth may be, the Ultimate Cloth is better. Why? Because it does a better job of cleaning, capturing and holding onto dirt. The Ultimate Cloth is made from MiraFiber which consists of fine, synthetic fibers, smaller than microfiber, that are so tiny they work amazingly well to grab and trap dust, dirt, and grease rather than just pushing it around.

Another great thing about the Ultimate Cloth is that it's machine washable and reusable. In fact, the cloth comes with a 5-year guarantee. Use it, wash it, and use it again, over and over for years. I've had my Ultimate Cloths for nearly four years and continue to use, wash, and re-use the same ones.




Streaky Glass and Mirrors? You Need the Ultimate Cloth!


I like the Ultimate Cloth better than regular microfiber cloths and prefer them especially for cleaning glass and mirrors, the TV screen, and even the screen on my Fire tablet and my phone. These cloths work beautifully in the kitchen on our stainless steel refrigerator, stove, and microwave, too. I also have one dedicated to the bathroom where I use it regularly to wipe down the shower walls and glass shower door.
The Ultimate Cloth makes quick work of fingerprints on stainless steel refrigerators and other appliances.
Dampen an Ultimate Cloth to easily clean smudges
and fingerprints from your stainless steel appliances.

Wet an Ultimate Cloth then wring it out well to clean fingerprints off painted surfaces such as walls, cabinets, or doors (inside or out). Our dog, Daisy, has a tendency to rub against the edge of the kitchen cabinet as she turns one particular corner so when I notice that the oil from her hair has accumulated there, it takes just seconds to dampen an Ultimate Cloth and easily wipe that greasy surface grime from the painted cabinet.

To use an Ultimate Cloth, always start by washing it out well (or run it through the washer) to remove any lint that might be left behind in the manufacturing process. Use a clean cloth dry for electronics, but otherwise dampen it slightly and wring it out well for most other surfaces.

Note that the cloth itself won't scratch, but never rub any surface with a cloth that has gotten especially dirty or has been used to clean greasy surfaces or if the cloth might have picked up any solid particles which could scratch the surface you want to use it on.

When you order, buy an extra pack of Ultimate Cloths to use on the car. Dedicate one to cleaning the windows, dusting the dashboard, or cleaning leather or vinyl surfaces inside. Use another when you wash the outside of the car. They work really well to clean hub caps, too, but don't re-use the same cloth on the paint until you've washed the cloth well to remove any grime or grease.

While the Ultimate Cloth can be used dry for some surfaces (like electronics screens) and cleans well with just water for most other surfaces, if you prefer to use a spray or other chemical cleaner on some surfaces, that's fine. Just remember to throw the cloth in the wash when you're finished so you don't accidentally use the chemical on a surface where you shouldn't.

The following under 3-minute video provides lots of information and will probably answer most of your questions about MiraFiber, so I'd suggest you watch it to learn more.



Machine Washable. Bleachable. Comes With a 5-Year Warranty.


Use this link to order a set of two Ultimate Cloths from Vat19. Since that company charges a flat shipping rate, you might want to order a couple of packs or more (they actually make a thoughtful gift) to have on hand. 

The price might seem high for a cleaning cloth, but I can honestly say that I've gotten more than my money's worth and I have no problem at all justifying the cost. And when I think how many paper towels I might have used in their place over these past few years, there's just no doubt at all that I've gotten my money's worth, and I believe that you will, too. 

Thanks for reading my Ultimate Cloth review. I can honestly say these are the best cleaning cloths I have ever used and I recommend them highly.

~Susan
Meet the Reviewer

Photos belong to the author




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Saturday, April 18, 2015

Review of a Twin Bed King Connector

Turning Twin Beds into a King Size Bed is Easy and Affordable

This is a practical solution for a teen whose outgrown twin beds, or for a guest room where it's necessary to alternate between twin beds and a large single bed.

If you've ever pushed two twin beds together, you know exactly what the problem is; the gap in the middle.

Without a twin bed king converter, we've gotten around this problem by putting several toppers on the mattresses.

However, if you move around a lot when you sleep, the gap is still an issue. Movement slowly splits the twin beds apart.

So being the creative sort, I placed non-skid padding under the mattresses to prevent the mattresses from splitting apart. Although that was an affordable way to address the movement of the mattresses, it didn't solve the dip in the middle.

This is Where a Twin Bed Connector Comes In

The one featured below has straps that wrap around the twin beds. It keeps the beds together.

You may still feel a dip or gap, however, if you place a mattress cover and other toppers on before the sheet, it should be barely noticeable.

Overall this is an affordable solution to transitioning a kids room to a teens room. You can keep the twin beds and convert them into a king for the growing youngster.

Most teens want a bigger bed, and if their room is already furnished with twin beds, this is a viable solution. Best of all, you don't have to buy a king sized bed!

How to Make it Look Nice:

If the room you're making over isn't going to be switched back and forth between twin and king, then it's easy to dress up the bed so it looks like it's always been a king bed.

  • If you have two headboards and you're able to remove them, then you could either go with an improvised headboard attached to the wall that's the width of both mattresses, or elect to skip a headboard altogether and simply deck the bed out with many pillows.

  • If you opt for pillows as the backdrop, without a headboard, you can use a bolster at the head of the bed so the pillows don't appear to be resting directly on the wall. I've done this myself, and it looks really nice.

  • Use a king sized bed skirt. With one skirt going around both beds. Without the appearance of two headboards, nobody will notice the beds were once twin beds.

  • I can't stress enough how padding the mattress with various covers makes a difference; I've used a mattress cover as well as a thick foam mattress pad and it really gives the bed that one piece feel.

The Bed Sheets and the Bedding

Two twin beds, especially with extra padding on top, is a little bigger than a standard king size bed; not much bigger, but enough of an issue that you'll need over sized or deep pocket king sized bed sheets. We love Jersey Knit Bed Sheets because they're stretchable, and they'll work nicely to solve this problem. However, if you're not a fan of Jersey Knit Sheets, then be sure to get king sized bed sheets with deep pockets.


The Non-Slip Padding Mentioned Above 
Ultra Stop Non-Slip Indoor Rug Pad, Size: 4' x 6'Ultra Stop Non-Slip Indoor Rug Pad, Size: 4' x 6'
Above I talk about the non-slip padding I put between the box spring and mattress, well I actually used ones designed to hold area rugs in place.

For us they worked perfectly. This one measures 4 feet by 6 feet, so I just bought a couple for each twin bed, and positioned them on the box spring so as to cover a good portion. I would position them to go over the gap in the bed as well. The Grand Fitted Quilted Mattress Pad Cover Hypoallergenic (Stretches to 18The Grand Fitted Quilted Mattress Pad Cover Hypoallergenic (Stretches to 18

Mattress Pad Cover

Here's an example of a king sized mattress pad cover that you can put over the twin bed king connector and mattress.

This one has 20 inch deep pockets as well, so if you want to put a layer of foam underneath (for added comfort) you should have a enough room. I would say, if you had to choose between the non-slip pads above and this, choose this. It's the best way to pull the mattresses together after you've used the twin connector.


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Sunday, April 12, 2015

How to Prevent a Door from Hitting A Wall or Closet with a Door Stop Hinge

Door Stop Hinge
Do you have a mirrored closet door that needs to be protected from a door handle that hits it when opened? And of course, being a mirrored closet, a regular door stop won't work?
A Review of a Product that Solves the Problem!
Well if so, after a bit of research, I found the perfect door stop to use that literally takes minutes to install, doesn't require any drilling, and won't stand out as an eyesore.
Hinge Pin Door Stops are a terrific little gadget that simply slip into the top hinge pin of the door causing the rubber protector to stop against the door frame and thus prevent the door or door handle from hitting the wall, closet door, or mirrored closet door beside it.
Several of the rooms in our home have mirrored closet doors that happen to be close to the main entry door of the room itself. 
The main washroom in our home is an example; when you open the washroom door, the handle can crash into the mirrored closet door and potentially break the glass. 
The floor in our washroom is ceramic, so a floor mounted door stop would be too much work to install, not to mention the awful thought of drilling into the ceramic!
The Hinge we Installed to Protect
Our Mirrored Closet Doors
So after going on the hunt for a solution, I came across the wonderful little gadget called a 'door stop hinge'. My husband literally put it on the door in five minutes.
We also used one for a door where the door would hit the wall before it would hit the door stop; for years it bothered me that our door was getting marked up, and now, after repainting our door and placing a hinge pin door stop in the top hinge...problem solved.
By Barbara Tremblay Cipak




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Saturday, January 31, 2015

A Personal Double Oven Review - What's Good and Not So Good About It!

Double Oven  Review - Smaller Oven on Top &
a Larger Oven on the Bottom
If You're Thinking About Getting a Double Oven Stove - Here's some Feedback
For years I insisted that once we were in the market for a new stove, we would get a stove with a double oven. We have a large family, and a double oven is necessary to handle the large meals that are required when everyone gets together for a celebration - especially Christmas!
Finally, it happened - a new stove was required - and finally we did in fact get that Double Oven Stove.
I learned a few things about a Double Oven since then, and thought I would share them with those looking for the same type of stove.
What I Like About the Double Oven Stove
  1. It's extremely handy when you have to prepare a large meal. The second oven is very useful, especially in warming up pre-made dishes
  2. It looks really impressive and modern
  3. Love not having to clean stove-top inserts like we had to with the old stove
  4. We've had it for a few years, and so far there's been no problem with it
  5. We took the extra step of getting a double oven stove with a convection oven - that's handy once in a while
  6. It's self clean (which I really appreciate)
  7. Cooks the food nicely
  8. Easy to use
What I Don't Like About a Double Oven Stove
  1. There are two types of Double Oven Stoves I could have selected - One with the smaller oven on
    Double Oven with Two Ovens the Same Size
    top and the larger oven on the bottom - The other with two ovens the same size (The two different choices are featured on this page) - I went with the former: The smaller oven on the top, although very convenient, it has a few limitations: Because the heating elements are so close to the food, the food can burn, so you have to watch it carefully. In fact I do not put cakes and pies in the top oven to bake anymore - The first time in my life that I ever burnt a homemade chocolate cake was by putting the cake in the smaller top oven to bake! The element is too close to the cake, so I suspect that was the problem. The stoves with the two ovens the same size more than likely wouldn't produce this result!
  2. I'm not a fan of a flat-top (so I discovered) - Yes, there are advantages to it (looks good, no grills to clean), however I find it marks up a bit too easy for my liking. We do keep it clean, but it's never perfect like it was when we bought it.
  3. Our old stove had an electrical outlet built into it, this newer model oven doesn't
  4. Although the convection oven is handy once in a while, for our family it's a bit of waste of money - so if I had to choose another one, I would select one without a convection oven built-in. We just don't use it enough to justify the added cost.
Two Full Ovens
In Summary, would I invest in a Double Oven Range again?
The answer to that is yes. The reason I say yes is that it's in an affordable price range for us, and although point number 1 in the 'don't like' column above does bother me, the convenience of having two ovens without doing a major renovation is worth it.
If I were doing a full kitchen reno, then no, I wouldn't get this double oven stove; I would have two separate ovens installed one above the other and get a stand alone stove-top installed on the counter.
By Barbara Tremblay Cipak - Funkthishouse.com



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Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Weapons of Mass DIY Destruction


Black Ops "Do or Di" - Anything is Possible
There are construction tools and then there are weapons of mass destruction.  We’re not talking nukes here.  Who needs nuclear fire power when one has a reciprocating saw that can pretty much destroy anything in its path? 

Yesterday, when I pulled that DEWALT saw out of its case, nothing seemed ordinary about my DIY mission.  Pulling the trigger on that bad boy transformed a seemingly mundane task into a black ops mission. 

Suddenly, I was able to rip through wood, metal, drywall—you name it—with ease.  The power at my fingertips made me invincible.  When put in a “Do or Di” DIY situation, this is the tool you want in your arsenal.
Check out my new product review, featuring current covert activities, then give Squidoo a try.  What is it that awakens your inner ninja?  Is there a product in your life that transforms you into a force to be reckoned with?  We want to read all about it.  

And now I am being called to duty.  There is a top-secret mission with my name on it. #TrySquidoo



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Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Writing Down the Bones


Anatomy of my Future Playshop
There is something powerfully transformative about the act of creation.   I have always known that the opportunity to create is my greatest motivator.

Each day, as I stand within the skeleton of the twelve-by-twelve DIY studio I am building, I feel a sense of awe at what can be built with one’s own hands, mind, and will.

If you are a DIY or HGTV junkie like I am, perhaps you have heard talk of homes that have good bones.  In the world of construction, bones matter.

I find it astonishing that these thin sticks I nail together in the right configuration of joints and ribs are so incredibly strong.  There is elegance in the simplicity… an understated beauty.

When the time came, yesterday, to cover the bones, for the exoskeleton is an important part of the structural integrity, I took a few moments to appreciate that which I would not be able to see moving forward. 

Having thoughtfully selected each individual bone, and cared for it during the process of building an inner sanctum for nurturing creativity, this was a moment to savor and celebrate.

This morning, as I write this post, I think of Natalie Goldberg’s classic book, Writing Down the Bones.   Freeing the writer within is about bones just as building a life is about good bones.  Writing down the bones is about expressing essence.  In writing about the essentials of our lives, we experience the creation of the world over and over again. 

I encourage you to write down your bones.  Free the builder within by becoming an essential part of our Squidoo community.  I can’t wait to see what you create with your own hands.




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Tuesday, May 20, 2014

A Penny for Your Thoughts


Will Work for Pennies

My DIY reality this week is all about pennies.  Not the kind I used to purchase penny candy when I was a child, or the bright copper ones I put in my penny loafers forty years ago.   My pennies these days are 12d’s, 8d’s, 6d’s, and everything in between.

As I pounded in several hundred nails over the past few days, I had lots of time to think about such things as the medieval system for classifying nails.  This is my brain hot-dipped, galvanized, common, shanked, ringed, sinkered, and bright box nailed.

So why are they called 12-penny nails… those three and a half inch nails that are giving me blisters and hammer elbow?  It goes back to how many pennies were needed to buy 100 nails back in the 1500s.  It turns out that the letter “d” after the number is an abbreviation for the most commonly used Roman coin (the denarius).  The number refers to the length of nail.

If I’m doing the math correctly, which is never a given, twelve pennies bought 100 nails back in the day.  I paid 445 pennies for 96 ring-shanked nails this past weekend.  Kind of made me long for the days of yore.  Can you picture it?  Me in a toga, eating figs, tapping in twelve denarii worth of nails? 

In the process of building a studio addition onto my mountain cabin, I am learning invaluable lessons that go beyond the importance of purchasing and using the right nails.  It seems each stage of the building process needs a different kind of fastener.  Early in the process I was tempted to use screws to make parts of the job easier and faster to complete.  It turns out that would have been a big mistake.  Screws don’t have the sheer strength provided by 12d nails.

Isn’t that true of building a life also?  Finding the strength that matches each phase of the process of becoming?  Just as I used the right kind of anchor hardware in the foundation stage of this do-it-myself project, I seek to live a life anchored in ways that ensure the stability to weather any storm.  

Isn’t it amazing that something we often take for granted, nails and pennies, are essential to building something lasting?  I invite you to join me in creating something worth every single blister.  As Squidoo's Home Renovator Contributor, I'm looking for a few kindred hammer swingers.  Please stop by today.  I'll give you a penny (worth at least $4.45 with inflation) for your thoughts.



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Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Tile in a Snap


SnapStone Floating Tile
Seven years ago I bought a new home that was about 70 percent complete.  Part of the 30 percent that remained to be finished included flooring in two bedrooms, the upstairs loft, a half bath, pantry, laundry room, and stairwell.  To make the house immediately livable, I put in some flooring that was trendy at the time.  I figured if a product passed the Divine Design test of my HGTV guru, Candice Olson, it was certainly more than worthy of installation in my home.

I’m still happy with most of the flooring I installed, but I have since rescued a dog.  Anyone who has cared for larger dogs knows they can be hard on flooring.  The area that has taken a beating is the stairwell landing where Toby likes to hang out by a picture window that gives him a place to keep an eye on what’s happening in our world.  I need to install a tougher material that can take heavy traffic.

Having decided on tile, since my animals love to soak up the sun in front of that window, I have been researching DIY options.  How I love to come across web pages that show an innovative home improvement product in action.  There are many websites pushing products, but few that are exceptional when it comes to demonstrating an actual installation.  I appreciate a how-to presentation that is honest in sharing what went right as well as lessons learned.

Here’s one of the best Squidoo lenses I found.  KateHon demos a fabulous floating tile flooring option while sharing before and after photos of a bathroom renovation.  I can see myself installing this tile floor in my home.  How about you?

Have you published a home improvement product review?  If so, stop by and let me know.  I hope to feature your work.  You can find me at Home Renovation Central and "Do or Di DIY."



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Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Beetle Mania

There's something you should know about me.  I'm a locabore (not to be confused with loco or boring).  Are you wondering why you've never heard this term before?  It's because I just made it up.  I do that a lot.

Perhaps you have heard of a locavore—a person dedicated to eating local foods whenever possible.  So what in the world is a locabore?  It’s a person who makes a commitment to using local beetle kill wood for a wide variety of construction projects.  The “loca” is for local and the “bore” is for the beetle activity that leads to a tree’s untimely death.  It’s a growing problem in my state (Colorado) and beyond.

I have been reading about green remodeling practices.  One of the important things we can do when building or remodeling is to use reclaimed wood.  When lumber is harvested nearby, the ecological impact is reduced significantly.  There is no need to transport the wood cross-country (which eliminates a much larger carbon footprint). 

Because dead trees are already dry and seasoned, there is no need to burn fossil fuels for the kilns that would normally be required to lower the moisture content of freshly cut living trees.  And, by using dead trees, we can lower the dependence on harvesting trees that are better left in the forest doing their best to keep our environment healthy.

This weekend, as I was purchasing supplies for a couple of ongoing home renovation projects, I found beetle kill pine boards on sale.  That made my choice very easy.  When I build with local woods, the advantages go well beyond financial and ecological gain.  Things that grow here look good in my home.  They are a natural fit.  You would expect to see native woods like aspen, pine, and fir inside a house that is surrounded by those kinds of forests.  There is a harmony that is both seen and felt.

Even if you live in an urban area, there are always sources of reclaimed timber and other architectural elements.  A source to consider is your local Habitat for Humanity Restore.  They stock recycled construction materials.  Always think “re” first as you aim for greener living and building (reclaimed, recycled, repurposed).

Let's learn how to be good to the place we call home.  We only get one chance at this.  Unless we want to be dead standing, it's "Do or Di" time.  





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Review This is Dedicated to the Memory of Our Beloved Friend and Fellow Contributor
We may be apart, but You Are Not Forgotten

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