Showing posts with label Gardening. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Gardening. Show all posts

Tuesday, August 9, 2022

Review Of Wolf Garten Shears For The Garden


Good quality tools are necessary when working in the garden. I prefer to use manual tools whenever possible in our garden. I find it more peaceful to use manual tools, better for wildlife and much quieter for ourselves and our neighbours. I also feel more connected somehow to our garden plants. 

Sometimes power tools are necessary for the garden, but using manual tools rather than electric ones is an even greater consideration now for us that electricity prices are so high. 

We find these Wolf Garten Shears easy to use with no energy costs at all, apart from your own physical power. 

We do like tools that are easy to use and do not require too much effort. I would also rather buy quality tools that suit our needs and aim to buy tools that are longer lasting.  



Wolf Garten Shears

Wolf is one of the brands I trust for gardening tools and are one of the brand of tools I use on a regular basis to keep our garden looking at its best. We also have secateurs of the Wolf brand and you can read my Review Of Wolf Garden By Pass Secateurs here. They have also proved a really great purchase. 

The shears are used in our garden for cutting back shrubs, perennials and herbs such as lavender and geraniums where we need to cut a larger area of foliage. We use them to cut back annual flowers and any straggly growth as well. 

Important aspects of garden shears are that they are sharp and cut cleanly. That it is easy to use with an ergonomic grip, a buffer to reduce jarring and pressure on our hands and wrists and it has a smooth action. In my experience, the Wolf Garten shears excel in all these areas. 




I do think for the price and the quality that Wolf Garten Shears are excellent shears.


Cutting Back And Pruning Plants With Shears

 Perennials require cutting back in late autumn after flowering has finished and when they are dying back. Equally, we can leave them until the following Spring. A Spring cutting back means that we leave the hollow stems and cover for our wildlife.

 


 Lavender is best cut back after flowering but it is important to not cut back into old wood as it may not regrow. We need to cut so you can still see green shoots. This cutting back ensures a more compact shrub that will have the best chance of flowering well the following year and we can also use the cut flower stems as decoration in the home. 

Hebes can be cut back lightly or some can be shaped into topiary-like balls as you prefer. 

Our Laurel hedge gets cut back a few times a year to keep it looking neat and manageable. 

Geraniums need cutting back after flowering. If we do this it tidies it up and also there is an opportunity that it may flower again. It will look bare for a week or two but the new regrowth is fresh green and lovely. 

 


 For any perennial you are cutting back it is important to cut close to the crown of the plant but above any new growth. We need a tool that will cut cleanly and not tear the plant.  

I love the way that these shears cleanly and easily slice through our thick lavender borders and cut our small conifers cleanly. In my experience, they do not pull or injure the plants. We do not want to be tearing or pulling on plants that need cutting back and these shears just make this job so much easier and quicker to complete. 




For a long time, I used my Grandads shears for these cutting jobs. While I love them because they were my Grandad's and are a link to a wonderful man I never knew as he died shortly after I was born, they are not easy shears to use for a long time. 

I will always love and treasure my Grandad's shears, when I hold them I feel a part of history and closeness to my Grandad. In addition, all these decades on they are still in great working order. However, I do believe these Wolf Garten shears offer an added level of comfort and features that I do appreciate these days! 

 


Good Qualities Of Wolf Garten Shears

  • When I use my Wolf Garten Shears I find they are so much easier on my hands and arms and are of good solid quality. I find they are the nearest shears to the robust, quality and feel of my Grandad's shears but with the added level of modern comfort!

  • Nonstick coated blades mean they rust a lot less and are much better when using them to cut plants with sticky sap. I clean them with a damp cloth and sometimes WD40 and a cloth. 

  • In my experience, they cut stems cleanly and sharply which is much better for the plants. 

  • Comfortable handles make the task of cutting back so much easier. They are simple to use and not hard on the hands or arms. 

  • They have a solid quality comfortable feel to the product which is important to me.  

  •  Good bright points of orange-red colour mean they are not easily lost in the garden. This is essential for me as I am always putting down tools in the garden, getting distracted and forgetting where I left them! 




There is a range of Wolf Garten shears, some normal sized for general cutting jobs, others about half the size developed for topiary hedging and smaller work, it all depends on your garden and what you need your shears for. 


Here Is A Selection Of Wolf Garten Shears




I personally would not attempt to cut a very large hedge with these shears but for tasks such as cutting back herbs and perennials, smaller hedges, smaller conifers, some topiary, annual flowers and general everyday pruning these manual Wolf Garten Shears are a great tool to purchase and wonderful quality addition to a useful garden tool collection.  

 

More Gardening Articles





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Tuesday, July 26, 2022

The Asparagus Fern As A Houseplant Reviewed.


 

We have an asparagus fern that was my Mums and it must be over 30 years old now. I love its gorgeous ferny delicate leaves which arch very gracefully. It has a versatile habit where it can be trained up supports or hung down from a high level to cascade. I also like that despite not always being pampered, it survives and thrives. 

It can grow to be a large houseplant but can also be pruned easily to keep it a smaller size if required. Personally, I like to see it grow to its full potential and to be a really lovely graceful delicate looking yet strong plant. 

We do however need some knowledge of its needs and care to keep it happy.


What Is The Asparagus Fern?

Ours is the large ferny arching Asparagus densiflorus ‘Sprengeri Group’with long thorny stems carrying delicate feathery leaves on long flexible stems. Often known as asparagus fern or lace fern. The other ones are the upright fox tail type fern or the sickle fern.  

Well despite its name it is not an asparagus though it shares the look of asparagus. You certainly cannot eat it as it is mildly toxic to humans and animals when ingested.

Also, it is not part of the fern family despite looking like a fern. It is in fact part of the Lily family and originates in South Africa in the dense tropical forests found there. 


Asparagus fern growing on supports


How To Care For An Asparagus Fern

As with all houseplants, it is important to know the conditions where they grow in the wild. As this plant comes from a warm humid semi-shaded environment we need to try to replicate that as far as we can in our own homes.

So it is best to keep this plant somewhere out of direct sunlight as the sun will burn the leaves. It needs some light through or the leaves will turn yellow. Semi shade is best. 

It must be watered regularly in the spring and summer just to keep it moist. Be careful not to waterlog it as that will rot the plant and may be the one thing this plant will not survive. 

I also find it likes a misting every so often in the warmer weather to simulate the tropical forest environment. I use a specific plant mister to do this with lukewarm water. I also keep ours in a pot inside another larger pot part filled with pebbles and keep the pebbles wet to increase the humidity. 

These houseplants do not like being in a draught or close to a radiator as it is too drying for them. 

If the leaves go yellow at the base this is quite normal and you can just snip them off. However, if leaves that are higher up go pale or yellow it is most likely a lack of water. 

These houseplants can grow large, though due to their habit do not seem to dominate a room. They can however easily be cut back with Secateurs or maybe a strong pair of scissors. I have cut ours back several times and it comes to no harm. 


Delicate soft ferny leaves on Asparagus fern house plant


I only repot when it seems to be getting potbound so perhaps once every three to four years in a good quality houseplant or general purpose compost.

Do wear a thick long sleeved top and sturdy gloves when handling this plant as the thorns are sharp and hard to avoid when repotting. I also tend to loosely tie up the plant with a soft twine when repotting to prevent stray tendrils from touching me.  

The leaves may go brown if touched too much so best to avoid the chances of doing that. 

If you make mistakes though in my experience it does bounce back which is a good thing in a houseplant. We are going through a heatwave with temperatures of around 40 degrees Celsius and no air conditioning and no matter what we cannot keep the house at optimal conditions for this plant and it is developing pale leaves as you can see from the photographs. However, with a little care and attention when the heatwave dissipates it will recover.  


Green healthy leaves and pale dry leaves on Asparagus fern

Asparagus Fern Pests and Diseases

It is generally a pretty healthy resilient plant as long as it has the right conditions and care. 

Spider mite is the only bug that really affects this houseplant and it is usually when it is too dry. You will see like a white spider's web over the plant. It is best to use a spider mite-specific insecticide in this case. 

If you have waterlogged the plant with overwatering then it may rot from the roots and this is hard to come back from. You can only try repotting in a good quality compost and hope the plant will survive. 

Pale coloured leaves usually mean it is too hot or too dry or both. In the recent heatwave when the house was hot, even in usually cool rooms no matter what we did,  ours has developed a few pale leaves and I am attempting to help by watering and misting. 

If the leaves go brown really all we can do is snip them off. The plant will generally survive as long as not all leaves are brown but may take a while to thrive. However, it is a sign you need to step up the watering and misting. 

 

Where To Display Asparagus Fern

This houseplant can grow very large up to about 1 meter or just over 3 feet tall and wide. It is a beautiful and showy plant but needs placing with care

I have found over the years living with this plant that it likes it best when either placed so that it can hang down from the top of a high cupboard or shelf or as we have it now so that it can climb upwards on supports. It has very long whippy stems carrying both sharp thorns and graceful delicate ferny leaves. These can easily be trained onto a support or allowed to hang down. 

Left without these options it tends to flop and sprawl all over the ground which is not so pretty or practical in a house. 


Long flexible stems on Asparagus Fern


It does not like direct sun either, bearing in mind it lives in a forest in the wild we need to offer it semi-shade and as high humidity as possible. 

Another point to bear in mind is that although the leaves are so soft and beautiful it also has extremely sharp thorns that from first-hand experience can really hurt! So it is best for everyone especially children and pets if we keep it so that you cannot easily touch it. 

The other rather strange reason for not touching this plant is that if you handle it too much the leaves can easily go brown.

It is often suggested to place it in a bathroom which would be ideal regarding indirect sunlight and humidity but we do need to be careful of the fact it is mildly toxic and thorns in an environment where we are showering or bathing! So if it is in a bathroom make sure no one can touch it. 

In my parent's house, it lived happily in our dining room on a large support on a stool behind a cabinet. There as a child I could not reach it but we could all admire it and it makes quite a statement.  

 We also have it in the corner of our dining room behind a furniture piece where it gets light but not direct sun, where we can enjoy it safely.

 You can display this plant as a standalone or it looks great in a group of plants with contrasting leaves and colours. 

It is unlikely to flower in most homes so you need to enjoy it for its leaf colour and form primarily. 


Beautiful ferny leaves
 

 Asparagus fern makes for a very beautiful large houseplant that with some knowledge can be kept happy as a long-lived plant in most homes. We love ours and will keep it as long as possible. While probably not a beginner plant, with just a little knowledge it is easy to be successful with this gorgeous houseplant.

 

 More House Plant Reviews

 Reviewing How To Take Care Of Your House Plants On Vacation

Swiss Cheese Plant Or Monstera Reviewed As A House Plant And Fashion Trend




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Monday, July 25, 2022

2022 Favorite Garden Tools

Oh garden tools! I have known quite a few in my amateur garden career. But there are some tools that become staples in the gardening collection. The tried and true. 

Some new, some old and all valued. So here are my top five cannot do without garden tools - helpers-accessories!

1. Container Gardening City Pickers Raised Garden Bed



Love, love this rolling cart for container gardening. After the loading up the cart with dirt, the cart still rolls easily. This is a very nice feature for not just moving the cart around a deck or patio, but if you have plants that can do well inside in the winter. Just roll the cart inside! Review here >> City Pickers

The raised bed is available in different colors to suit your landscape. I have only had to fill the bed once with dirt and each year a successful harvest. 

2. Ironclad Gloves

New entry for this year. Purchased in 2021 to replace a pair of garden gloves and the Ironclad Utility gloves have quickly become a favorite. Review here >> Favorite Utility Gloves Review: Ironclad Gloves

The gloves fit very well to allow easy maneuvering of garden tools of all types.

3. B Hive Smart Hose Timer Wifi



Purchased in 2021 this WIFI timer for your sprinkler quickly headed to the top of my list. So convenient to use and easy to program. Mobile App included to trigger gardening from your phone. Review here>> B Hive Hose Timer

Set the timer up for your vacation and no worries. The watering schedule can be as varied as you'd like (time with projected weather) or as simple and straight forward. I prefer the later and since the weather is so incredibly variable here, I check weather first, then program the timer or trigger it manually.

4. Solar Light




Loving this solar light! I purchased it a few years back and the lights have worked flawlessly all year round. A combination garden and security light that has not disappointed. In the warmer months I have a few nestled in the garden to light a path and in the winter the lights are moved and used as security lights. Review here >> Aootek Solar Light

5. Blue Shoes Disposable


Soggy yard, but need access in spring or during rainy season. These little booties are great to save your shoes or gardening shoes in inclimate weather. Review here >> Blue Shoe Guys 

The shoes are also great to have on hand for contractors visiting your home. While many will bring their own disposable booties it is always nice to have spares on hand for when they may forget - especially in winter or spring.





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Monday, July 18, 2022

Reviewing the Fiskars Clearing Machete

Why on earth would I be reviewing a machete? There are many good reasons to own a machete. Personally, I live on a piece of land with difficult terrain. While I intentionally allow some of the lot to grow wild, hopefully as welcoming habitat for the birds, butterfly, and wildlife, these weeds quickly take over areas I do not want them in. Lawn mowers and weeders (both wired and manually operated blade) do not suffice. I am very pleased with the Fiskars Clearing Machete.



The Fiskars 15" Blade Clearing Machete

After watching many machete reviews, I chose the Fiskars. To be honest, I mostly chose the Fiskars due to price point and availability (it was available here locally and I purchased it on the day I wanted to use it for the first time). While I honestly wanted to purchase some of the other machetes that were recommended, I did not feel I could spend $100 at the time. For something that I didn't know whether or not I'd be able to use it productively. I am very pleased with my purchase.

The Fiskars Clearing Machete Official Information:

  • 15" blade (24" total length)
  • curved steel blade
  • cushioned, composite, comfortable grip
  • weighs 2 lbs
  • Full lifetime guarantee
  • Nylon sheath included
Additional things I have noted, the blade is steel and reportedly can rust, however, it comes new with what appears to me to be some heavy, protective paint. I have not yet chipped or worn down that paint and I am very pleased with the blade. I am aware that tools made of steel should be stored in a dry place and benefit from being cleaned with appropriate oils.

I purchased an axe sharpener in order to sharpen my blade. While a few online reviewers complain of a dull blade, I was aware that I'd need to do some sharpening (as you need to do with axes and such) and I have only good experience with the blade sharpening and retaining the edge while using this in my yard/woods.

I LOVE the handle. It is a longer handle so I can choke up near the blade or hold on near the very end of the handle (my usual choice due to wanting distance from the thistles I'm cutting).  The handle is comfortable and I feel protected from the blade with the shape of the handle and that "bumper" between the handle and the blade.  I like that the handle also has a hole where I can insert a rope handle.

This machete is heavier than some. Two pounds is quite a bit for a woman in her late 50s to be swinging around. Two pounds is quite a bit for a younger active person to swing for an all-day job. But.... I only use it in small bursts of time. And I believe that the weight adds power to my wimpy swings. 



Yard Care

My yard is on a small mountain ridge. The slope is steep and the ground is rocky shale - from a sandy texture to very large rocks scattered everywhere. Mowing is difficult to impossible.  I have been advised to use weed control chemicals to eradicate these weeds. I do intentionally allow the weeds to grow because the monarch butterflies love the thistle, the birds love the mullein flowers, the pollinators love the assorted wild flowers, and the deer use the cover to hide in.  The problem is that all of these invasive plants, thistle, and wildflowers grow up quickly and are a nuisance where I don't want them. 

For example, the thistle grew to 6 - 7' tall behind my house (where the meter-reader needs to walk). 

The first area I cleared with the machete (the meter is to the left)
I was impressed with being able to clear out a significant portion of that thistle patch

The thistle has also grown around the back and sides of the chicken coop (allowing more cover for predators and more scratches on me when trying to herd a naughty chicken to the coop).


A manual weed cutter is very helpful for the grass-like plants that grow up to around 6 - 
10" tall in open areas.  But it does nothing for the mullein and thistle plants. And those plants got away from me.


The Fiskars machete is perfect for the larger weeds; especially the thistle. It cuts through them like cutting through warm butter.  

Outdoor Adventuring, Overlanding, and Off-Roading

When I had my Jeep and did ORV (off-road) trails and primitive camping, this machete would have been perfect! I regret not having purchased on during that time in my life.  I could have bush-whacked through brush on overgrown trails or areas where I needed to turn around but didn't have room.  I could have cleared the green brier thorny vines in areas where I needed to pass through on foot.

Hunting and Fishing

People who hunt and fish often use trails that become overgrown. In my opinion, this is a perfect tool to attach to a backpack and have along for clearing trails or sitting spots. I'm thinking of all the times I fought the thorny vines to get to my catfish spot at North Point. This machete would have been so helpful. 

Recreational Hiking Trails 

Whether trails are very remote or fairly well-used and maintained, the thorny vines often grow across very quickly. This machete is a good choice for people whose jobs it is to maintain these trails as well as people like me, back in the day, who preferred to strap on a back pack and walk the trails where others rarely walk. I am a short woman of only 5'4" so this machete hanging from my waist is not practical. But it would have been perfect tucked into the area of my Osprey pack between my back and the pack. 

Agricultural - Crop Harvesting and Brush Clearing

I cannot speak much to agricultural harvesting and machetes. I believe I have seen plenty of clips of pineapple harvesting with machetes but I may be mistaken.  I am sure that this machete would be an excellent choice for clearing fence rows of brush and plants.  I look forward to having an extra tool (non-chemical) to try to clear away some of my rampant poison ivy vines. 

I am quite sure that I am not covering most of the uses for a good machete in agriculture and forestry industries. 

Related Links:

Our Wednesday Elf previously reviewed the Fiskars Long-Handled Swivel Grass Shears. Those shears allowed her to remain in a standing position while trimming grass along sidewalks and around the mailbox post. They swivel to cut in a horizontal or vertical position. Great for folks with actual lawns and sidewalks!!  See her review here for more information.

And don't overlook that Review This has a Gardening section. You can find the tab at the top of the page or click here and start scrolling down to see the wonderful variety of reviews related to gardening. 




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Monday, June 27, 2022

Favorite Utility Gloves Review: Ironclad Gloves

One of my absolute favorite finds for working around the home, lawn or garden are my Ironclad Utility Gloves. When I needed to replace my garden gloves last year I visited my local Ace Hardware store and found these fabulous gloves in the garden/utility glove section.



It is pretty rare to pair fabulous with gloves so this is probably an indication of how happy I am to have found these gloves! They have become a go to staple for work around the house, garage, lawn and garden. So versatile, so comfy, affordable and practical.

Comfort And Fit

The Ironclad Gloves are sized which I think make ALL the difference for a comfortable fit. No more swimming in garden gloves. True to fit. The gloves have velcro straps around the wrist to ensure a solid fit and keep out all those stray yard clippings and dirt from gardening.

Washable

Yes! The gloves are washable! I used these gloves for gardening with wet spring mud and the gloves washed beautifully. But the gloves must be hung dry!

Nimble

One of the best features of these gloves is the nimble feel for using with power tools, rakes and shovels. Particularly with power tools that require you to hold down a button while pressing another button to operate the tool. The gloves allow you to easily and comfortably operate small buttons or levers on power tools. 

Strength & Durability

So strong, so durable yet so lightweight. The Ironclad gloves are first and foremost  utility gloves that I happen to also use in the garden. If you have any type of plants with thorns, prickers or sharp edges these gloves work wonderfully.

Recommendation

I highly recommend the Ironclad Gloves for the home and yard. You will not be disappointed in the quality and versatility of these gloves. 

Where To Find Locally

My first stop to shop local is always my local Ace Hardware. This is where I originally found the gloves and their recommendation was spot on.

Ace Hardware Reviews

Ace Hardware Review by Wednesday Elf

My Favorite Local Ace Hardware by The Savvy Age









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Tuesday, June 14, 2022

Advantages and Disadvantages Of Moving House With Your Garden Plants Reviewed


I know that within the next few years we will likely move house. We have put a lot into our garden which will be the hardest aspect of our home to leave. 
For our house move we are hoping to find a smaller house and a bigger garden! 

When you move house of course you take all your belongings with you. However, we do not usually take items considered integral to your house such as doors, fitted kitchen and integrated appliances. So when it comes to the garden I have been considering are all the plants also integral to the sale, do we leave everything or are there plants we want to take with us? Is it acceptable to remove plants from the garden and how do we do that? 



 

We have some very treasured plants with special memories.  
Many of our plants were given to us as gifts or donated by our family in the early days of living here. Others are gifts we have given each other or have particular memories. So we are reluctant to leave these plants. 

However, I do not know what type of garden we will be moving to the aspect, or even exactly the soil type. This does not bother me too much though as I know most will be adaptable or live happily in large pots or containers. So I know that the plants I want to take that thrive here will be perfectly fine in a new home. 

However, if you are moving to an area with a very different soil type and do not want to look after container plants you may need to think carefully about which plants you take with you.

 


Removing Plants From Your Garden When Selling

 First, though I had to consider the ethical question of is it right to remove loved plants from a garden you are selling?

 Buyers will view our house and garden as it is and understandably expect it to come with all the plants they see upon viewing. 

Someone once told me that to know what you can take and what you can leave you should imagine your garden turned upside down. anything that drops off you can take, otherwise it should stay! So really anything rooted in the ground stays but containers and cuttings and seeds can be removed. 

 My opinion is that it is acceptable to remove plants and take cuttings as long as you are upfront with the buyers about which plants you are totally removing. I think it is unacceptable to buy a house and then find upon arrival that half of the plants you thought you were also buying have been dug out changing the look and feel of the garden.

I have learned that it is important to check as inground plantings are often considered part of the property or a fixture. So 
if you are planning to remove a significant proportion of plantings or obvious plant from your garden it is best to indicate those exclusions in the listing process. If it is decided later than this to remove planting, an amendment should be made with the buyers agreement. It is always best to fully disclose exactly what you are planning to take from the garden. Do always check the law/rules in your country/state exactly the situation when selling. 





Five Options To Move House With Your Garden Plants. 

An increasing number of sellers are taking special plants with them when they move house.

So if you want to take your treasured plants and sell the house and garden honestly, what can we do? Here are five possible solutions. 

 1. Dig Up Plants And Move Into Containers Before Selling. 

 At least a year or so before you plan to move if possible, make a plan to dig up and move any treasured plants you must take with you into pots. Before the sale begins put these pots to one side or outside the garden. Make it clear in the selling instructions or listing that anything in a container is an exclusion, not part of the house sale.

This may work for plants that are not too big. For me, this includes several treasured roses, a small Camellia and a few small evergreens. Small herbs are coming with me, two of our strawberry plants and a couple of our many Heucheras. 

Our garden is so packed full of shrubs, perennials, bulbs and other plants that these will not be noticed from the overall plan. However, you need to plan ahead for this as certain plants can only be moved with the least disruption to the plant at specific times of the year. 





 2. Take Cuttings Of Your Plants And Gather Seeds Before Selling Your Home

 However, some plants are simply too big to move in this way and would leave massive gaps in the garden if I took them with me which would not be fair. For example, our beautiful Camellia and our gorgeous climbing rose.  It would take an enormous effort to dig them up, may, in fact, kill the plant and would leave a gap in planting that would look very wrong in the garden. In addition, they are used every year for birds to nest. I do not want to take this valuable resource away from the wildlife.

 I do not know if the new buyers will want them and I really hope they will keep them. I would be devastated if they felled them, but they are not practical to move. So what I have done is to take cuttings of the camellia and the rose. This way I can take a little of the plant and grow it on to become just as gorgeous as its parent.





No one will notice cuttings taken and it will not change the look of the garden or any current benefit to wildlife. I am also  taking cuttings of our laurels, some of the roses, fuchsias, forsythia, rosemary our large wegelia and bridal bouquet.

 It is important to start this process as soon as you think about moving. For many plants, there is an optimum time to take cuttings. If they do not take one year you will want to have another year to take them so ideally start as early as you know you are moving. 

Taking cuttings will save us a huge amount of money and leave the garden still beautiful for the buyers and available for the wildlife.





3. Negotiate With Buyers About The Plants.

This is an option if you would like to take certain plants with you and have not had time to pot them up before viewings.

When you have a firm offer check with the buyers if they would mind if you took the plant. Some won't mind at all, others may refuse, so this is riskier but still worth asking. 

 Seek advice from your Realtor or Estate agent before taking this course of action. This may need to be negociated and added as an exclusion in the sale agreement.

 4. Ask Buyers If You Can take Unwanted Plants.

 Ask the buyers if they plan to or later decide to get rid of any plants to let you know and you will collect them. It is probably better if the new buyers who are now the homeowners actually dig up the plants and you just collect them otherwise there could be misunderstandings. 

This only works if you remain local and if the buyers actually remember to contact you. I feel this is the least likely strategy to work and could incur issues that may not be worth it.

5. Take Photographs Of Your Garden And Plants

If there are treasured plants that you cannot take with you for whatever reason then take a photograph. We can then carry the memory of the plant with us. 

We can even get the photographs made into posters, greeting cards, or canvas prints such as the one below. 


Tools For Taking Plant Cuttings And Moving Plants

All you need in order to take cuttings is a strong pair of secateurs such as these Wolf ByPass Secateurs.

You will also need some good quality compost for full grown plants and cuttings and however many pots of different sizes you think you will require. 

Labels are also a good idea so you can tell what all the cuttings are.

I like to have a variety of sized pots. I reuse every pot that comes into our garden so none ever go into landfill. 

For the purpose of moving larger treasured plants I have bought a few larger planters in different sizes for the plants I am taking with us. I would recommend ones with handles so that they are easier to move. Once they are served their purpose they will be reused for vegetable growing forever. 


 Advantages To Taking Your Existing Plants

 1. You take treasured plants, especially those with special significance and memories with you. These are valued things you may not be able to bear to leave behind. 

2. You save significant amounts of money on replacing favorite plants. Plants are so expensive now so if you can take cuttings and seeds, especially it will save you a lot of money. 

 3. You have continuity to settle in a new place. Familiar plants may help you to settle more easily.

 4. You can easily stock an empty garden for very little financial outlay. Gardens take time to develop so if you have some plants ready you are ahead. 

 Disadvantages To Taking Your Plants

 1. Your new garden may be very different from your existing one and your plants may not suit or fit the place and the soil type and aspect may be different. For example from heavy clay to chalk. Or South to North facing. 

 2. You may want a totally new start with fresh, maybe very different plants or garden theme. For example a change from cottage garden to modern minimalist. 

 3. You may be moving to a garden that is already well-stocked with plants you love.

 4. You may be moving to a place with a balcony or courtyard your existing plants will not fit into or be happy living there. 


So as an avid gardener who loves her plants I am seeking a happy medium. We are taking some treasured plants and taking cuttings and seeds of others we want. I aim to pot up all those we are taking before the house goes on the market and be upfront with buyers that anything in a container will not be staying.

We have put such a lot into this garden from an empty patch to a vibrant, full and wildlife-friendly paradise. It will be a wrench to leave, but that won't be for quite a while yet and when the time comes I know I will look forward to taking some of the treasured memories with me and creating a new garden.  


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