Thursday, March 4, 2021

The Moonlight Child - Book Review

 

Things just aren't adding up.  Late one night, while out on her patio watching a lunar eclipse, Sharon spies what appears to be a very small child washing dishes in the kitchen of the house across her back yard fence.  How can that be?  The neighbors don't have a child that young.  And even if they did, why would she be doing dishes hours past her bedtime?  

Perhaps it is nothing, but what if it isn't?  Sharon Lemke finds herself wondering if her imagination is merely running wild.  Soon, though, when Niki, an eighteen-year-old who has recently aged out of the foster care system comes to live with her, Sharon's concerns become shared.  

As it has been said, it takes one to know one, and Niki knows plenty about what it means to be endangered.  The clues are pinging Niki's internal radar system.  She isn't willing to leave things to chance if there is a child who may be at risk.  

Though Sharon has followed proper channels (notifying the appropriate social services authorities about the unusual circumstance next door), bureaucratic wheels often turn much too slowly for those fearing the worst.

Niki and Sharon decide to take matters into their own hands.  Can they pull off a clandestine investigation without endangering themselves or others?  Is there something sinister at play here? What will happen if they are caught in the act of spying on neighbors who may not be what they outwardly appear to be?  

For me, an exceptional book is one that makes me care.  I was all in shortly after being introduced to Sharon, Niki, Mia, Jacob, and Griswold.  There was so much to love about the redemptive moments.  Of course, there are individuals you will likely despise.  Every powerful story needs that counterbalance.  

I came away from this read thinking about the people who pay attention when they feel something isn't right.  Not only that, I reflected on the difference between those who act on their intuition and those who do not.  This story drove home for me the necessity of being a noticer who actually does something for the lost and the unseen individuals of the world.

I highly recommend The Moonlight Child by Karen McQuestion.  








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16 comments:

  1. Diana, you certainly piqued my interest in wanting to know who this child is and why they are keeping her hidden.

    I know involving Social Services over a child is tricky. Once, some 40 years ago, three of us neighbors called them on another neighbor who were leaving their children just 5 & 8 years of age home alone for hours every day. They also neglected their dogs!

    Thanks for your interesting book review. Now I'm going to wonder - until I read The Moonlight Child - just what the circumstances are surrounding this child in the story.

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    1. I think this book has your name written all over it, Elf. Thank you for being the one who took action.

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  2. Oh Diana, I think this book is my next read. I love to hear stories about people who care and go out of their way to make a difference, not for themselves, but for others. You have hit a good vibe with me! Going on my next to read list right now. Thanks for your review!

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    1. Glad we are sharing good vibrations, Olivia. :-)

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  3. Diana this book certainly sounds intriquing. You told just enough in the review to pique my interest. Thanks for a great review.

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    1. Thanks for picking up on how I like to review books, Mary Beth. I am of the "just a little dab'll do ya" school of reviews. I think it's important not to reveal too much (which spoils it for the reader). I want you to discover things for yourself (and decide what to make of it). Enjoy!

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  4. This sounds like an excellent book! Any book that makes you evaluate yourself, even your own non-action, is a great read. This is not a book I would have picked up on my own, but I definitely want to read it now. Truly an awesome review!

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    1. Thanks, Mouse. I tend to choose books that stir up the altruistic nature to which I aspire (at all times and in all ways). I hope this book does the same for you.

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  5. Diana, this certainly sounds like a thought-provoking novel that seems to weave in several important themes, including aging out of the foster care system and child endangerment. It sounds like an important reminder that trusting your instincts when something seems “off,” and doing something about it, especially if it involves someone else’s welfare - and even more so if that someone is a child - could save that person’s life, in more ways than one. Thank you for another wonderful book recommendation!

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    1. Yes... many critical themes. I didn't mention it in my review, but I especially appreciated the bond that formed between Sharon and Niki (retiree and former foster child with nowhere safe to go). We are here in the world to look out for one another and to be available when needed.

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  6. I agree with Mary Beth, you wrote just enough to make me want to read more. Thanks for another great book review.

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    1. Thanks, Sam. I try to avoid spoilers and revealing too much. My goal is to rev up your curiosity enough that you are eager to discover more.

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  7. Again, thanks to ReviewThisReviews, I have a heads-up on another good book. I'll be putting this on my list as a gift for my mom, who I know would enjoy this one.

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    1. Your mom is blessed to have you gleaning such great gifts here all of the time. I hope she enjoys this read as much as I did.

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  8. Thank you for an intriguing book review, telling us just enough but now I am wanting to know more about what happened! I like the sound of this book with its interesting characters and highlighting making a difference, caring and intuition. A book that makes you care, think and reflect is a great book! Thank you!

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  9. So true about what great books do: make you care, think, and reflect. I feel very fortunate when I discover a book like that.

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