Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Fabric Pots Reviewed

Gardening In Fabric Pots

garden vegetables
Could these grow in a cloth container?
Image courtesy of pixabay.com
Do you have a garden? Have you considered growing in fabric pots? Let's review the possibilities. 

I am familiar with the concept of container gardening and have tried it a few times over the years. Until recently, I was not aware that another option is to grow my vegetables, herbs or flowers in a fabric pot. Now, that sounds interesting!

The advantage to using a cloth container is that it allows for better aeration for the roots and better drainage, too. From what I glean from the description of the brand that I am interested in using; transplanting from them allows for a better chance of the plant not going into shock. I am thinking it might work well for starting a small tree to be planted elsewhere when it gets some height to it. 

I love that there are so many options for sizes to grow in, too. A fabric pot can be as small as one gallon or as large as 100 gallons. (Now that is a huge bag!) Personally, I am drawn to the 7 gallon size because I think it offers some real versatility. It also seems to be a very popular size with other gardeners, too. The pots made from cloth would also fit in places that a standard pot or container might not. They won't be as heavy to move, either. 

The possibility of using these little fabric pots over and over again appeals to me. When the growing season is over they can be laundered and saved for the next batch of gardening. Granted, we can do the same thing with clay, resin and plastic pots but the bags would take up much less storage space when not being used. Storage can be a problem for most of us especially the urban gardeners who need to grow their items on a small patio or balcony. 

How about you? Did you know that fabric pots were even an option? Would you be willing to try them out? I am going to give them a try.




Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article.


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8 comments:

  1. These fabric pots are new to me, but look like a terrific option for starting many kinds of plants. Such clever things are available today. Thanks for finding these, Bev.

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a timely article. I just was at my son's home and he is growing peppers and tomatoes in plant bags. They look wonderful, healthy and they seem to be happy. It certainly makes growing and weeding so much easier. I think they are a wonderful addition to anyone's garden.

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  3. I have never tried the fabric pots for gardening and I often prefer container gardening simply because of our dogs. They would certainly be easy to move since they have handles. I wonder if I could actually set them in the ground to prevent roots from spreading like daylilies or lambs ear. Those flowers are not bothered by my pups, but they will take over a small flower bed.

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  4. What an interesting idea! I don’t have much of a green thumb, but my sister does. I’ll definitely let her know about these.

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  5. well this is timely, for the first time in my life I'm thinking of planting lettuce and am researching how to do it on my patio - want to use a raised bed, but these are very interesting as well!

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  6. I've seen these cloth pots for growing tomatoes. I would certainly give them a try.

    ReplyDelete



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