Showing posts with label lighthouse. Show all posts
Showing posts with label lighthouse. Show all posts

Thursday, August 8, 2019

Review of Nobska Lighthouse and Sharing Photography with Children


On a recent July morning I was able to visit this historic lighthouse on Cape Cod and share my love of lighthouse photography with my granddaughters.

Brief History of Nobska Lighthouse

When we arrived at this historic lighthouse on the southern point of Cape Cod in Falmouth we took a few minutes to read the signs and learn a bit about the history of the lighthouse.

The lighthouse is nestled between Vineyard Sound and Buzzards Bay with Martha's Vineyard spread right out in front of it.

From the early colonial days until the twentieth century the route from Nantucket and Vineyard Sounds provided the shortest route to bring passengers and goods from Cape Cod to all points south and west.  In the 1800's vessel traffic through this area was second only to that of the English Channel.  Because of this a need for a lighthouse to keep vessels safe was imperative.

Nobska light was first opened in 1826 as just a tower above a keepers house.  It was replaced in 1878 by the present 42 feet cast iron tower.  This tower sits 87 feet above sea level.  It flashes every 6 seconds and is visible for 17 miles.

Photographing the Lighthouse



The above is a photograph of my granddaughters, Kate and Emily in front of the lighthouse.  They both brought along their new cameras to learn about photographing the lighthouse with me.

The next two photos are ones that were taken by the girls.  The first, a close up shot of the lighthouse, was taken by Kate.  The second one was taken from across the street by Emily.



I too enjoyed the view from across the street from the lighthouse.  Here are two photos that I took looking back at the lighthouse.



Across from the Lighthouse

After looking at the lighthouse closeup we crossed the street and took a path that led down to the beach.  It was a fantastic view of the islands that lay just off the coast.  Here is a map that tells about what we saw.


It was very interesting to see the map and then look at the scene ahead of us.  We watched ferries leave from Cape Cod heading over toward Martha's Vineyard.  It was early morning when we arrived and the fog was rather heavy, but as the morning progressed the fog started to lift and we could see more of the islands.



Photographing with my Granddaughters

It was a wonderful experience sharing my love of photography and lighthouses  with Kate and Emily.  They listened carefully as I showed them how to look for interesting photos.  After they took a few of the lighthouse from different angles, their interest was more toward photographing the bees in the flowers.


Zazzle Products from our Photos

This keychain design was made from one of Emily's photos and the mug is from my photo.




Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article.


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Thursday, July 25, 2019

Photographic Review of Buffalo New York Lighthouse





I enjoy photographing lighthouses and on a recent July day we made a stop on our trip east to visit the beautiful lighthouse in Buffalo NY.  This lighthouse is located at the mouth of the Buffalo river at the north entrance to Buffalo harbor.


Brief History of Buffalo Lighthouse


In 1805 Congress designated the Village of Buffalo to be a port of entry into the United States.  It was determined that the port needed a lighthouse but because of the War of 1812 construction was put off.  In 1818 the first lighthouse was built in Buffalo.  As the city of Buffalo grew into a major port a new lighthouse was needed.  The current lighthouse was built in 1833 at a height of 68 feet. You can read more about the history of the lighthouse at the following link Main Buffalo Lighthouse .


Photographs from my Visit


I was hoping to get up close to the lighthouse and had read the instructions online with directions how to get there by walking alongside the coast guard station.  What they didn't say was that this path was only open on Friday, Saturday and Sundays and since it was Wednesday I had to find another way to view the lighthouse.  I got back in the car and drove down the road to the nearest park on the harbor.  I found a charming park with a beautiful rain garden, some delightful wind catchers and paths all along the harbor.  The wind catchers were on a hill and when I climbed the hill, I got a great view of the lighthouse.  I had a 210 mm lens with me and it worked great to zoom in on the lighthouse.  The following photos are of the lighthouse and the park.





                                                               




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Thursday, July 13, 2017

Review of Port Clyde Maine

Marshall Point Lighthouse

A Trip to Port Clyde

 

During a June trip to the Rockland/Camden area in Maine we decided to take a day trip to Port Clyde.  Port Clyde is a delightful midcoast fishing village that is about 20 minutes from the Rockland area. It was a beautiful clear day and I thought the blue sky would work well with the white lighthouse and gangplank.

Marshall Point Lighthouse

 

Marshall Point lighthouse is located at the very tip of the St. George's Peninsula in Maine.  It is a rather short lighthouse that sits about 50 feet offshore on a rocky ledge.  This ledge is exposed at low tide and is connected to the shore by a white wooden walkway.  The placement of the lighthouse is a photographers dream.  It is easy to get a great shot without anything in the way.

An interesting fact about this lighthouse is that it was seen in the movie "Forest Gump".  In the scene where Tom Hank's character runs  cross country and he ends by running up the wooden walkway and then turning around and starting over again.

Watch this classic movie and see the scene with the lighthouse!


The coast around the lighthouse was beautiful.  Wildflowers grew all along the coast and I enjoyed walking around the area and capturing the beauty of the coast.





Port Clyde Harbor

 

Port Clyde General Store and Dip Net Restaurant

Looking out at Port Clyde Harbor

Port Clyde is a small town (just over 300 people) but I was delighted with all it had to offer.  After we visited the lighthouse we drove down to the harbor, which is the center of the town.  There we found a general store and a couple of restaurants. One was the Port Kitchen which was in the general store.  There you could eat or have them pack you a picnic lunch to take with you on your excursion.  The other choice was the Dip Net restaurant on the deck by the dock. We chose the Dip  Net restaurant and enjoyed some wonderful lobster rolls sitting outside on the deck.  They had several different ways you could have your lobster rolls fixed and my husband and I both chose to have our lobster sauteed in butter and then put in the toasted rolls.  It was an excellent choice and we thoroughly enjoyed our meal.  

The painter  Andrew Wyeth lived in the area and now his son Jamie lives in the area on an island just off  the coast.  Upstairs from the general store is Linda Bean's Wyeth Art Gallery.  Here you can purchase works by Jamie and also some rare prints of his father's.




Marshall Point Lighthouse on Zazzle Products


 Marshall Point Light


Marshall Point Light

 

Guidebook for Maine

 

I have found this guidebook very helpful in finding all of the little out of the way places to photograph.  It also gives great ideas for places to take photographs and best angles to shoot.  Along with that it has directions to get to the areas and lots of helpful hints.




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Thursday, October 13, 2016

Photographing Boothbay Harbor Maine

Review of Harbor Area

Boothbay Harbor is a beautiful and very picturesque little harbor on the coast of Maine.  It sits on the edge of Boothbay Peninsula that juts out into the Gulf of Maine.  We visited on a clear September monrning when the sky was so blue that it cast a blue tint to everything around it.  It was a great area to take photographs and I stood at various spots along the harbor and took in all the sights.  The scene below is Boothbay Inn as seen from across the harbor.
If I turned a bit right of the Inn I captured this white church on the edge of the harbor.  There were lots of boats big and small



Cuckolds Lighthouse


I love to photograph lighthouses and the Boothbay Harbor area gave me the opportunity to photograph several.  They were all offshore on islands so getting good photographs required a longer lens.  The closest to shore was Cuckolds lighthouse.  We drove past Boothbay Harbor a few miles to South Point Island and I was able to capture this historic lighthouse.  This lighthouses started as a signal house in 1892 and then in 1907 a light tower was added atop the signal house.  This lighthouse was automated in 1975.  This lighthouse and grounds has been recently restored and is now open for overnight stays, weddings, lobster bakes and other events.  I took the following photos from a dock off South Point island.



Other Lights Seen from Harbor


The other lighthouses that are offshore of Boothbay Harbor are hard to see with the naked eye.  I was told one was 10 miles offshore and the other 15 miles and I could only capture them if I took a boat. None of the boat tours were running at the time we were there so I got some use out of my new 600mm lens.  The first photo below is Burnt Island Lighthouse, you see it on the island on the right hand side of the photo.  I believe the second photo to be Monhegan Island light.  It is the one I was told was 15 miles away so it is very small in my photo.  I find it fascinating to read about and photograph all of these lighthouses.  The coast of Maine and the island around it are dotted with many lighthouses.  Many of the lighthouses are now longer in service, however the Coast Guard still keeps watch over 56 of Maine's historic lighthouses.



Zazzle Products from my Photographs


Here is the guidebook I used to find my way around Maine.


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