Monday, April 27, 2015

Recipe Review - Drunken Mussels

Do you love seafood but find it intimidating to cook shellfish at home? Do you love mussels and wish you knew what to do with them? Chef John gives us an easy and delicious Drunken Mussel recipe. So easy that even I was able to make at home successfully.


Mussel FAQs for Beginners


What in the world are Mussels?
Mussels are "bivalve mollusks" with an elongated shell. In other words, a sort of clam but with a long shell instead of a round shell. 

Where do they come from?
They are found in freshwater lakes and streams as well as saltwater and intertidal areas. 

They are pretty ugly, why would you eat a mussel?
Mussles are also considered a healthy food because they are low in fat, high in lean protein, and contain a variety of nutrients. These nutrients include Vitamin B12, Vitamin C, iron, and Omega-3 fatty acids.  Besides that, they are pretty tasty.

How would I cook a mussel?
They can be prepared in a wide variety of ways: baked, fried, smoked, broiled, and steamed. 

I love mussels, especially steamed in wine sauce. But I have never been brave enough to make my own.  I have had friends over the years who have made them as I watched, but I was still intimated and hadn't tried on my own.

When I found Chef John and his Food Wishes site, I knew that I had to try making mussels at home.  You see, not only was his Drunken Mussel recipe easy with few ingredients, he included a step-by-step video that was easy enough for me to follow.




My Mussels Now and in the Future


I successfully filled my favorite stock pot with Chef John's steamed mussels in lemon, garlic, and wine sauce - his Drunken Mussels. That first attempt was so easy and tasty that I made the next batch with my own additions:
Old Bay Seasoning


  • 1 lb. browned sage sausage
  • I replaced the red pepper flakes with a generous sprinkle of Old Bay seasoning
  • 1 lb. of jumbo shrimp


I was thrilled to find that mussels are extremely easy to make at home. As long as you make sure the shells are scrubbed with a small, stiff brush, remove any "beards" that may be hanging from the shell, and don't wander away from the kitchen while they are steaming, delicious drunken mussels are very easy to make. If you like mussels but haven't made them at home, I hope you give this recipe a try. I think you will find it to be as delicious as I did. 








9 comments:

  1. I, personally, cannot eat seafood, but I have several family members, including my own husband, who will probably love this recipe! I also have a brother who I affectionately refer to as our seafood chef who I will send this article to. Thank you for sharing your recipe and tips for cooking mussels.

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    1. Thank you for visiting and commenting even though you do not eat seafood. How wonderful to have a brother who can be referred to as a seafood chef. I'm a bit envious.

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  2. Sounds delicious. I've cooked many kinds of seafood and continue to do so frequently (especially shrimp dishes) since I live near the coast like you do, but have never tried mussels. Will have to give this recipe a try.

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    1. I LOVE shrimp. And crab cakes. YUM.

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  3. I'll pass on the mussles, but I bet this would be good with clams.

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    1. Coletta, I have not tried clams yet, but I plan to now that I'm a bit braver in the kitchen.

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  4. I don't cook shellfish because we aren't supposed to eat them, so I'll have to pass on this one. The seasoning, however, might be good on other things. I'll have to remember it.

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    1. Barbara, I use the seasoning on chicken quite often. I never knew about "old bay" until i moved here. I really like it. There are also potato chips with the seasoning, but I don't eat chips very often.

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  5. I know a few people who would LOVE this! I'm not a fan of these, but those who are would go nuts for this!

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