Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Let's Sew Together and Build Lasting Memories

Ask me where I learned to sew and you’ll get the answer that’s commonly expressed by seamstresses, tailors, and designers all over the world. “My mom taught me to sew!” Ask that question and look into our eyes. You’ll see a fondness as we recall awesome memories of spending time with our moms and their sewing machines.

When I opened the cover of Let's Sew Together: Simple Projects the Whole Family Can Make by Rubyellen Bratcher (Potter Craft, New York, 2014), memories of the time I spent sewing with my mom flooded my eyes. No matter what kind of problems mom and I may have had while I was growing up, we always ironed things out with the help of mom’s sewing machine.

Mom and I bonded early in life over the sewing machine. She didn’t have a how-to manual, she just let me play along with her on projects that wouldn’t harm my tiny hands. As I got older, she trusted me to cut the fabric, not my long hair.

Mom and I made some cool projects over the years. Clothes, dolls, handbags, quilts, and anything else that caught our eyes. As I thumbed through Let’s Sew Together, I saw how mom and I could have made our projects even cooler with the tips offered by Bratcher. With four young daughters, Bratcher knows what kids like, how to get kids involved in sewing, and how to hold their attention.

Let’s Sew Together is written for the mom that has a basic knowledge of sewing and knows how to operate a sewing machine. Moms with no sewing skills shouldn’t be discouraged from trying this book. There are ten no-sew projects for moms and kids to learn together. Start by making a pom-pom for some soft ball tossing fun. Make little boys a bold bow tie and little girls barrettes with baubles. Or, make stories come to life with a no-sew storytelling box.

For the mom that feels comfortable using a sewing machine, there are 27 sewing projects that are appropriate for pre-school age kids. Bratcher provides easy-to-sew projects that even adults will love. I fell in love with several of the projects and have already started the Quirky Rag Doll found on page 124.

I admire the way Bratcher combines sewing lessons with learning lessons. While helping children make Cheerful Flip’Em Placemats (page 68) and Prep & Play Place Settings (page 71), Bratcher suggests books with a food theme for parents to read with kids, shows how to teach proper place setting, and talks about the importance of feeding our children well. There are similar helpful learning activities sprinkled generously throughout the book.

I appreciate that Bratcher includes sewing projects for boys. Not only can boys help make their own clothes, there is a super hero robot to share adventure stories, a fortress for hide-and-seek fun, and drums to make a lot of noise.

If your child has expressed an interest in sewing, I highly recommend this book. There are a variety of projects for clothing, jewelry, table settings, pillows, educational toys, fun time toys, and party decorations. You’ll also find ways to make each project unique by letting kids have their hand at fashion design.

I give this book 5 stars. Click on the book cover below. This is an Amazon link that will take you to the book's detail page where you can purchase your copy.


Disclaimer: I received this book from the Blogging for Books program in exchange for this review. My opinions are my own.

11 comments:

  1. yep,Mom but also both grandmothers taught me too!

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    1. That is so cool, Heather! Do you still sew?

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  2. This sounds like a great book. The combination of learning sewing along with those little extras (teaching kids proper place settings - wow!) is a wonderful way to help kids and moms alike. This book would make a great gift for young moms, and grammas, too.

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    1. Hi Susan! I am really enjoying this book. The sewing projects are so simple, yet with a little creativity, these projects can be turned into something really awesome. I'm putting my own spin on one of the doll patterns in the book and really liking the result.

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  3. This sounds like such a wonderful book and one every seamstress should have on her shelf! My mother and grandmother taught me how to sew. I have even commented several times that I come from a long line of seamstresses. Sewing with my mother and my grandmother created a very real bound between us.

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    1. I am so thankful that my mom taught me to sew. Even thought I haven't used my sewing machine in years, it's like riding a bike, I never forgot. My old machine has such a calming effect on my world. It's an awesome stress reliever.

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  4. What a sweet story about sewing! I learned a lot about sewing from my Mom and Grandmother. My Mom's first sewing machine was a treadle machine! I remember that when I was a child. By the time I got to learn to sew she had a new machine that me and Dad and my brother picked out at the mall in 1963. I learned on that machine and eventually she gave it to me when she got a newer machine. She still has the third machine. I have been sewing cloth dolls and grocery bags. I love sewing. I don't make as much as I used to. Great story!

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    1. Hi Lacerrose! I'm glad you enjoyed my story. That is so cool you have your mom's sewing machine and the one you learned on. I learned to sew on my mom's 1958 Singer Slant-O-Matic and I'm still sewing with my Sweet Singer. Dolls are my favorite and good for you on the grocery bags.

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  5. Coletta, that sounds like a very good project books for parents who sew and who want to do projects with the kids. My mom had a sewing machine. I wish she had spent time showing me how to sew.

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  6. Certainly a book to remember for those interested in sewing. Makes a good gift selection as well. Wonderful story about you and your mom, so sweet. My mom sewed all of my figure skating dresses, so although I didn't learn to sew I did get to watch her in action. Enjoyed your review Coletta.

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  7. The way you describe this book with its sewing and living lessons combined reminds me of my days in home-economics class way back in Jr. High School.

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