Showing posts with label sad disorder. Show all posts
Showing posts with label sad disorder. Show all posts

Sunday, June 30, 2024

A Review of How The Weather Can Affect Our Mood

A Review of How The Weather Can Affect Our Mood

How Weather Can Influence Our Mood (If We Let It)

Have you ever noticed how a sunny day can instantly lift your spirits, while a gloomy, rainy day might make you feel a bit down? 

I've often mentioned to my family not to allow the weather to dictate their feelings, thoughts, or outlook. I understand how challenging that can be for some people. However, after immersing myself in the profound teachings of Michael Singer, a New York Times Best Seller, I've learned that letting go of even simple things we cannot control, like "the weather" can significantly contribute to a more peaceful existence - and according to Mr. Singer, it's good practice for letting go of those bigger issues.

A Poem Inspired by Embracing Positivity Despite Gray Skies

The other morning, I woke up reflecting on this topic and penned these thoughts. It's not unusual for me to have "words" come from nowhere (lol), as I've been writing poems since I was eight years old.


Let's explore how different types of weather can influence how we feel.

Sunny Days and Happiness

There's something about a bright, sunny day that just makes us feel good. Apparently, one reason behind this is that sunshine increases the production of serotonin in our brains. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that helps regulate our mood; higher levels are associated with happiness and well-being. So, when the sun is shining, we tend to feel more energetic, upbeat, and motivated.

Rainy Days and Melancholy

Conversely, cloudy and rainy days can sometimes make us sad or sluggish. This is partly because the lack of sunlight can lead to lower serotonin levels. Additionally, the gray skies and the sound of rain can create a more subdued and reflective atmosphere, affecting our mood. For some people, this might mean feeling cozy and relaxed, while it could lead to a sense of melancholy for others.

Cold Weather and Comfort

Cold weather can have a mixed impact on our mood. For some, the chilly air and shorter days can bring about a sense of gloom, especially if you're not a fan of winter. However, cold weather can also make us appreciate the warmth and comfort of our homes more. Cozying up with a blanket, a hot drink, and a good book can create a comforting and pleasant mood.

Warm Weather and Activity

When the temperature rises, it often brings a sense of excitement and energy. Warm weather encourages outdoor activities, socializing, and vacations. Being active and spending time outside can boost our mood and overall well-being. However, extremely hot weather can sometimes lead to discomfort and irritability, so it's all about finding the right balance.

Seasonal Changes and Mood Disorders

For some people, the change of seasons can profoundly impact their mood. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that occurs at certain times of the year, typically in the winter when there's less sunlight. People with SAD may experience symptoms like low energy, difficulty concentrating, and feelings of sadness. Light therapy and other treatments can help manage these symptoms. However, checking in with your medical professional is wise to determine the best approach.

Finding Your Weather Sweet Spot

Everyone is different, and our preferences for certain types of weather can vary widely. Some people thrive in the heat of summer, while others feel they are at their best in crisp, cool autumn air (that's me!). 

It's important to consider how weather conditions affect your mood and find ways to make the most of them. Whether planning activities that match the weather or finding ways to stay positive during less favorable conditions, understanding the connection between weather and mood can help you navigate the ups and downs.

In conclusion, the weather may impact our mood, from the uplifting effects of sunshine to the reflective nature of rainy days. 

Knowing how weather patterns affect us can help us to better manage our moods and make the most of each day, no matter the forecast.

I'm a big fan of the changing seasons, and I especially love Autumn; how about you?




Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article. “As an Amazon Associate, Ebay (EPN) and/or Esty (Awin) Affiliate, I (we) earn from qualifying purchases.”


Thursday, October 15, 2015

Review: Will a Sunlight Lamp Help SAD Disorder?

If you suffer from seasonal depression, known as SAD or seasonal affective disorder, then this is a very important question for you. My review is based on my experience, and I am not a medical professional. Your results may vary, but here's what I've discovered while using a sunlight lamp to help with SAD disorder.
Here's what I've discovered while using a full-spectrum sunlight lamp to help with SAD disorder.
The author's sunlight lamp.

The lamp in the picture is the sunlight lamp that I've used on my desk in my home office for several years now - and I love it. It helps improve my seasonal depression (SAD disorder) during fall and winter (also referred to as the winter blues). It also provides excellent lighting at my desk while I'm working all year round.

The sunlight desk lamp gives off light that is soft and natural, not harsh and hard on my eyes. I don't claim to fully understand the scientific explanation, but the light from this lamp simulates the colors of natural light, so that the light produced appears similar to sunlight. It's a cool sunlight, though, so don't worry about the lamp producing heat. Mine stays on for hours every day, stays cool and does not heat up the area around it. Instead, during the daytime it balances the light I work in (the lamp is on my left and I'm fortunate to have a big window on my right). When it's dark outside, the lamp provides all the light I need across my workspace.

Don't confuse a sunlight lamp with a sun lamp; a full-spectrum sunlight lamp won't give you a tan. While there are claims that a full-spectrum lamp helps produce vitamin D in our bodies, I'm skeptical of that. Don't stop your supplement if you take one. However, having a good amount of natural light most definitely puts me in a better mood. Like many others, I suffer to some degree from seasonal depression (or SAD disorder) and having plenty of soft "sunlight" to work in most definitely lifts my spirits during the winter months. I've used this lamp long enough to know that that claim is absolutely true, at least for me, and I would recommend using this lamp if you suffer effects of seasonal depression or live in a low-light latitude.

Inexpensive to Operate, Long-Life Light Bulb


The official light output of the sunlight lamp is 150 watts though it only uses 27 watts of energy. In other words, it's inexpensive to operate.

The bulb life is 10,000 hours and, while I haven't measured the exact hours, I've used my current lamp for over four years and just recently replaced the bulb. Given that the light is on for many hours most days, I'd say the bulb probably lived up to its long-life promise.

Other Features of the Sunlight Lamp That I Like


  • The touch on/off switch. My previous lamp had a toggle switch (we lost that lamp in a fire) and when I ordered this one I didn't even realize it had a touch switch. What a happy accident! I really enjoy being able to just touch the switch to turn the light on. 
  • The lamp looks nice. It's not a decorative lamp meant for a fancy living room, but it's sleek, nice-looking, and looks pretty as well as professional on my desk.
  • The small footprint. The lamp does not take up a lot of space on the desk. The base is about 8 inches long and 6.5 inches wide. 
  • The height is adjustable. My lamp is adjusted to about the highest point I can get it, about 18 inches high. That works for me. Occasionally I'll want to contain the light a bit, so I'll lower it by pivoting the lamp at the neck and adjusting the top. It's simple to move and stays put nicely at any height. 
  • It only moves when I want it to. The lamp doesn't slide on the desk though I can pick it up and move it easily if necessary. I like that it doesn't slide. It's also heavy enough that it doesn't tip.  
  • It's also available as a floor lamp, which would be absolutely perfect for people who do hand crafts. Placing the sunlight floor lamp next to your comfy craft chair would be a wonderful idea! (Think "gift idea"!)

So, Will a Sunlight Lamp Help SAD Disorder?


Based on my personal use, I do believe that the sunlight lamp helps improve seasonal depression, but I'm not a doctor so if SAD disorder is a problem for you, seek out a professional opinion. Or order a sunlight lamp and try it for yourself.

Do you use a full-spectrum sunlight lamp? For SAD disorder or just as a nice desk lamp? Feel free to share your comments about how you like it.

P.S. Replacement bulbs for the Sunlight lamp are sold on the product page or pick one up at your local Walmart.


Or find one on eBay:

~ Susan Deppner




Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article. “As an Amazon Associate, Ebay (EPN) and/or Esty (Awin) Affiliate, I (we) earn from qualifying purchases.”


Most Recent Reviews on Review This Reviews






Search for Reviews by Subject, Author or Title

The Review This Reviews Contributors



SylvestermouseSylvestermouseDawn Rae BDawn Rae BMbgPhotoMbgPhotoBrite-IdeasBrite-IdeasWednesday ElfWednesday ElfOlivia MorrisOlivia MorrisTreasures by BrendaTreasures by BrendaThe Savvy AgeThe Savvy AgeMargaret SchindelMargaret SchindelRaintree AnnieRaintree AnnieLou16Lou16Sam MonacoSam MonacoTracey BoyerTracey BoyerRenaissance WomanRenaissance WomanBarbRadBarbRadBev OwensBev OwensBuckHawkBuckHawkDecorating for EventsDecorating for EventsHeather426Heather426Coletta TeskeColetta TeskeMissMerFaeryMissMerFaeryMickie_GMickie_G

 


Review This Reviews is Dedicated to the Memory of Our Beloved Friend and Fellow Contributor

Susan DeppnerSusan Deppner

We may be apart, but
You Are Not Forgotten





“As an Amazon Associate, Ebay (EPN) and or Etsy (Awin) Affiliate, I (we) earn from purchases.” Disclosure Statement

X