Showing posts with label room additions. Show all posts
Showing posts with label room additions. Show all posts

Sunday, September 2, 2018

How to Position Twin Beds to Create Separate Areas in a Room

Reviewing How to Layout Twin Beds So They're Separate from Each Other

The standard room layout for twin beds, is to place them side by side with a nightstand in-between.

However, there are creative ways to define areas in a shared room.

Below are three typical bedroom shapes you'll find in most homes: Rectangular, Square and L-Shaped.

Furnishings for a room with twin beds tend to be two beds, two nightstands, two desks, one or two dressers and or storage trunks and accessories.

Tip: If the room has a decent sized walk-in closet, put the dressers inside of it. You can place dressers under a section of clothes, and use the area above the dresser to hang smaller items.

1. Suggested Layout for Twin Beds in an L-Shaped Bedroom:

An L-Shaped room is the easiest floor plan to distinguish separate sleeping areas.

This floor plan makes the twin beds appear almost hidden to each other. Both areas have a nightstand, a desk and in this design a shared dresser. Again, if possible, put the dresser in the closet.

Floor Plan Layout by Funkthishouse

2. Suggested Layout for Twin Beds in a Rectangular Shaped Bedroom:

With a rectangular shaped room the tendency is to assume the beds have to be positioned side-by-side. That's absolutely not the case.

If the room is narrow, and doesn't allow for a lot of furniture, then use twin sized beds with drawers built in the bottom. That way you've eliminated the need for a dresser. Or again, if there's a walk-in closet, put the dresser in the closet.

When space is very tight, choose beds with built-in drawers. Here are a few examples:



Remember, if you decide to get beds with drawers, a nightstand positioned incorrectly can block the opening of those drawers. Twin beds with storage can also come in a large number of designs including some with storage in the headboard. If the headboard doesn't offer built-in lights, add creative strip lighting.

Floor Plan Layout by Funkthishouse.com

3. Suggested Layout for Twin Beds in a Square Shaped Room:

This layout will depend upon where the doors and windows are positioned in the room. However, you can still create defined areas by thinking outside the box.

In a square room, our design instinct is to place twin beds side-by-side. But don't let that thinking stop you from setting up defined areas. Even square rooms can have separate areas for twin beds.

In the floor plan below you'll notice the room was split in half. The position of the main door allowed for that. Essentially one half of the room is allocated to one twin bed area and the other half for the second bed.

In this design there wasn't room for a dresser, but as mentioned above, there are multiple ways to accommodate storage. Here you'll see a storage trunk at the end of each of the beds. The beds can have drawers, or a dresser can go inside of a large closet.

Floor Plan Layout by Funkthishouse.com

BONUS TIP: Small Bedrooms and Selling Your Home

During my real estate years frequent comments were about bedroom size. Most people feel that an empty room is larger than a furnished room. It isn't.

An empty room looks small.

People tend to need a visual to gage what will fit into a space. If the room is small, use bed and wall storage to illustrate how efficient the space can be.

Measurements to give you a sense of bed sizes and space:
  1. Standard king size beds measure 76 inches wide by 80 inches long. (6.33ft by 6.66ft)
  2. California king size beds measure 72 inches wide by 84 inches long. (6ft by 7ft)
  3. Standard queen size beds measure 60 inches wide by 80 inches long. (5ft by 6.66ft)
  4. California queen size beds measure 60 inches wide by 84 inches long. (5ft by 7ft)
  5. Standard double size beds measure 54 inches wide by 75 inches long. (4ft by 6.25ft)
  6. Standard twin size beds measure 39 inches wide by 75 inches long (3.29ft by 6.25ft)
  7. Extra long twin size beds measure 39 inches wide by 80 inches long. (3.29ft by 6.66ft)
Next, learn how to affordably convert twin sized beds into a king bed...



Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article.

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

A Penny for Your Thoughts


Will Work for Pennies

My DIY reality this week is all about pennies.  Not the kind I used to purchase penny candy when I was a child, or the bright copper ones I put in my penny loafers forty years ago.   My pennies these days are 12d’s, 8d’s, 6d’s, and everything in between.

As I pounded in several hundred nails over the past few days, I had lots of time to think about such things as the medieval system for classifying nails.  This is my brain hot-dipped, galvanized, common, shanked, ringed, sinkered, and bright box nailed.

So why are they called 12-penny nails… those three and a half inch nails that are giving me blisters and hammer elbow?  It goes back to how many pennies were needed to buy 100 nails back in the 1500s.  It turns out that the letter “d” after the number is an abbreviation for the most commonly used Roman coin (the denarius).  The number refers to the length of nail.

If I’m doing the math correctly, which is never a given, twelve pennies bought 100 nails back in the day.  I paid 445 pennies for 96 ring-shanked nails this past weekend.  Kind of made me long for the days of yore.  Can you picture it?  Me in a toga, eating figs, tapping in twelve denarii worth of nails? 

In the process of building a studio addition onto my mountain cabin, I am learning invaluable lessons that go beyond the importance of purchasing and using the right nails.  It seems each stage of the building process needs a different kind of fastener.  Early in the process I was tempted to use screws to make parts of the job easier and faster to complete.  It turns out that would have been a big mistake.  Screws don’t have the sheer strength provided by 12d nails.

Isn’t that true of building a life also?  Finding the strength that matches each phase of the process of becoming?  Just as I used the right kind of anchor hardware in the foundation stage of this do-it-myself project, I seek to live a life anchored in ways that ensure the stability to weather any storm.  

Isn’t it amazing that something we often take for granted, nails and pennies, are essential to building something lasting?  I invite you to join me in creating something worth every single blister.  As Squidoo's Home Renovator Contributor, I'm looking for a few kindred hammer swingers.  Please stop by today.  I'll give you a penny (worth at least $4.45 with inflation) for your thoughts.



Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article.