Showing posts with label choosing wall color. Show all posts
Showing posts with label choosing wall color. Show all posts

Sunday, April 28, 2019

How a Room's Color Can Affect Your Mood

Funk by Color
Did you know the colors you choose to decorate a space with will dictate the room's overall mood?

In a recent article we talked about the basic rules for choosing color when you decorate a space. That article also discusses 'Mood' as one of the pertinent considerations.

So let's review the Mood that each of the main colors evoke:

Red - Excitement

Red carries several meanings and all of them fall under the umbrella of excitement. Red represents rage just as much as it screams 'I love you'. In other words, if you need a room filled with emotion, red should be your go-to color. Splashes of red can make a room calming. However, if you plan to feature a whole wall of red and other red accessories, ensure the room is meant for social gatherings. You might even encourage intense discussions and debate in a red powered room.

Blue - Tranquility

Blue is the color of calmness and tranquility. However, if the room is entirely two colors such as blue and white, the space will feel cold more than calm. Three to four colors in a space along with your main choice color will achieve the intended affect of that main color (especially with blue). When you're seeking a peaceful, relaxing mood, combine light and dark blues together and soften the space with at least two other accessory colors.

Yellow - Uplifting

When you want a space to reflect a cheerful, happy, hopeful energy, choose yellow as the main color. We associate yellow with spring and summer so it's not a stretch to connect those seasons with an uplifting mood. Get ready for a little shock … did you know that yellow is also the color of intelligence? Yep, apparently intelligence has a color. Yellow is the color of the mind and it represents acquired knowledge. When you want to encourage learning, believe it or not, decorate with yellow.

Green - Renewal

The color of green represents two polar opposites. We typically think of nature, renewal, freshness and the environment when we decorate with green. However, green is also the color of money and can represent greed, jealousy and ambition. In home décor it's safe to say that a green themed room is normally chosen to create a fresh and harmonious environment. I mean, who decorates for greed, lol.

Orange - Enthusiasm

Orange is the color of creativity, social activity, determination and believe it or not, healthy eating. It's also an action color. Think of orange as the verb of colors. Most of us know the most popular 'buy button' online is orange. Makes sense right? After-all, orange is the verb of color. Orange is also ideal for a space where fun, interest, adventure and excitement are the primary mood goals. Go ahead, paint a wall in your kitchen orange! Orange is the social color that promotes healthy eating and conversation, making it ideal for the kitchen. Use various shades, or a softer shade if bright orange is too much. On a personal note, orange and yellow are my favorite colors :)

Purple - Wisdom

Purple is the color of royalty, luxury, power and spirituality. That's a fairly broad range, however indirectly each of these traits are connected to one another. If you're looking for a room that evokes grandeur with a bit of mystery, a purple themed room is the way to go. On a personal note, my young girl bedroom décor was purple, white, and pink. Without knowing, I must of been a mysteriously royal person who craved wisdom. :)

Did you read last weeks article on the color choices for spring and summer? You'll also get a quick tutorial on how to combine colors.

Have fun with color!


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Sunday, April 21, 2019

Decorating Color Schemes for Spring and Summer 2019

Funk by Color
If you haven't had a chance to read about Pantone's color of the year for 2019, you can learn a little about it here.

Pantone not only designates a color choice for the year, it also establishes color groupings for the seasons during that year.

For 2019, Pantone has created suggested palettes that reflect uplifting energy:

1. Embracing Nature - Freshness with Blues, Greens and Zesty Limes
2. Joyful - Radiant with Pink, Purple, Blueberry and White
3. Color Play - Fruity and Bright Mango, Mystical Violet and Watery Pastels
4. Innocence - Light, Life and Hopefulness with Soft Pink, Blueberry and Soft Blues

You can take a peek at Pantone's color schemes for each of the above four moods here.

Innocence by Pantone

Here's a simple example of how to incorporate the colors of 'Innocence' into a decorating theme. You can feature any of the colors in pieces you find yourself drawn to. If a blueberry couch isn't your thing, then choose a soft pale blue or blush pink sofa then introduce blueberry via the rugs, drapes or accessories.


Embracing Nature by Pantone

Below are pieces you can include into a decor theme that focus on the freshness of nature. The color scheme outlined for this theme focuses on blues, greens and limes. Of course you don't have to stop there. Pops of wheat and soft ice can be used to further lighten the overall look.


Color Reflects You

Most of us tend toward neutral décor. More often we choose neutral because we're unsure how to mix and match colors. It takes a little extra knowledge to learn about color and how to mix them together. Below is a brief explanation of the color wheel to help you with your next decorating project.

Understanding the Basics of the Color Wheel



  1.  Complementary Colors: Two colors opposite each other on the wheel
  2.  Split Complementary Colors: Uses three colors. One color matched to two colors adjacent to it's complementary color (example, blue with yellow-orange and red-orange)
  3.  Analogous Colors: Three colors next to each other on the wheel
  4.  Triadic Colors: Three colors equally apart on the wheel
  5.  Tetradic Colors: Four colors in two sets of complementary colors (pink, green & blue, yellow)
Have fun with color this spring, even if you only add it with flowers!



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Sunday, February 10, 2019

The Basic Rules for Choosing Colors to Decorate Your Space

How to Choose Colors for Your Space: 1. Mood, 2. Temperature, 3. Harmonies
Looking at a room and making choices can be overwhelming. No need to fret, just keep these three basics in mind as you tackle your project: Mood, Temperature, Harmonies

1. Mood

In a previous home decor article we discussed how choosing the mood for your room was the first essential step to starting a decorating project.

Once you've established the mood, be it light and airy or warm and cozy, you need to then determine the color scheme for your space.

2. Temperature

Warm Color Choices for Home Décor

Red, yellow and orange, and variations of them, are considered warm colors.

If your goal is to create a space that feels like being wrapped in a blanket, safeness and security, then dominate your space with warm colors.

Where we live also determines our approach to decorating. Standard logic applies: Colder climates lean towards warmer decorating themes and warmer climates attract cooler décor themes. However, don't be guided by that, do what you like.

Cool Color Choices for Home Décor

Blue, greens and light purples fall into the cool color category. Cool colors remind us of water and the sky. Depending upon how you mix and match colors they can also reflect the feeling of ice and snow.

Think about nautical themes where multiple shades of blue are used, and you'll get a good idea of what cool energy is suppose to feel like.

3. Harmonies - Use the 60-30-10 Rule

Decorate using the 60-30-10 rule. It's an easy to understand basic rule outlining percentage of color use.

60 Percent: The main color occupies 60 percent of the space. Use this color for larger areas such as furniture, walls and flooring.

30 Percent: The secondary color choice would consume 30 percent of the décor in the space. Logically you would use the next obvious items to feature this color. Items to consider in this shade would be drapes, smaller furniture pieces, bedding and even an accent wall.

10 Percent: The third color choice would be used for smaller accessories such as throw blankets, pillows, lamps and wall art.

How to Put it All Together - Choosing the Actual Colors

1. You've selected the mood. Check.
2. You've decided upon the temperature. Check.
3. Now you need your 60-30-10 color scheme

BUT...

You're not sure how to choose the actual colors for the 60-30-10 rule.

Last week we discussed Pantone's color of the year for 2019. In that article three color schemes were outlined, however there are several more to consider.

Here's a brief summary of color harmonies:

1. Triadic Color Scheme - Three colors evenly spaced on the color wheel
2. Square Color Scheme - Four colors evenly spaced on the color wheel
3. Complementary Colors - Colors directly opposite each other on the color wheel
4. Analogous Color Scheme - Colors that are adjacent to each other on the color wheel
5. Monochromatic Color Scheme - Involves all the shades in one particular color
6. Achromatic Color Scheme - Unsaturated or near neutral colors such black, browns, greys or any hue or lightness

Here's a sample of a color wheel so you can see quadrants and opposites at a glance. 




A Personal Choice Video from Wayfair that Explains 60-30-10 and Color Schemes

If you learn best by watching videos, this one is easy to understand. Before tackling your next decorating project, start by watching this:


Here's to your decorating freedom, have fun :)


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Sunday, February 3, 2019

What is Pantone's Color of the Year for 2019?

What is Pantone's Color of the Year for 2019?
A Review of How Pantone Nails it Again with Their Choice for 2019's Color of the Year

Each year Pantone chooses the color based on what hue best represents what's needed most in society.

The 2019 color choice was based on friendly, joyous, and cheerful human connection. With the overwhelming influence of digital technology consuming our lives, 2019's color represents a step back into human, earthly connection.

The 2019 Color of the Year is Living Coral 16-1546

Living Coral as explained by Pantone represents nature and connection.
"Living Coral emits the desired, familiar, and energizing aspects of color found in nature. In its glorious, yet unfortunately more elusive, display beneath the sea, this vivifying and effervescent color mesmerizes the eye and mind. Lying at the center of our naturally vivid and chromatic ecosystem, PANTONE Living Coral is evocative of how coral reefs provide shelter to a diverse kaleidoscope of color" - by Pantone.com
Why Does Pantone's Color of the Year Matter?

If you don't care, it doesn't matter. However color surrounds us from cradle to grave and most of what we do involves color.

BUT remember, color represents feelings. Our feelings often dictate our life. Those wiser than us know how to harness it.

Every color evokes emotion. Color means something, says something and is used by companies to sell you stuff. So even if you don't care, color is affecting you, sometimes subliminally.

Color of the Year Drives Trends from Fashion to Home Décor

You're not going to choose the design for a room based on the color of the year are you? Actually if you love the 2019 color of the year and want to recreate it's energy for a space, then yes you will.

This particular shade of coral encompasses several percentages of multiple colors:
  • 98.82% red
  • 46.27% green
  • 41.47% blue
How to Choose Colors to Match Living Coral in Your Room's Design

Without getting overly technical, using the diagram below, I've outlined a few fundamentals about color.

Choosing Colors for a Room Design Featuring Living Coral
You aren't tied to these specific shades, but to help you make choices, the above colors are the ones chosen for the harmonies below.

TRIAD Color Harmony for Your Room:
When you're using a triadic color scheme you choose three colors evenly spaced around the color wheel. Notice on the above photo that two colors are labelled 'Triad'. Both of those colors, plus the 'Living Coral' are evenly spaced on the color wheel. If you're comfortable with these shades, the color choices are done for you. Go ahead and pick accessories such as rugs, drapes and wall color based on these three colors.

SQUARE Color Harmony for Your Room:
A square color scheme are four colors equally spaced around the color wheel. Again, to make it easier for you, match 'Living Color' with the three boxes above labelled 'Square'.

COMPLEMENTARY Color Harmony for Your Room:
Complementary colors are opposite each other on the color wheel. When you want to have a particular item or items stand out in the space, use a complementary color. However, keep them to a minimum to avoid your room being too stark.

INVERTED Colors:
The inverted color featured above is the 'inversion' or inside out version of 'Living Color'. Use it for accessories or other items you want to stand out or pop in the space. One example could be pillows and throw blankets.

The above is just a brief outline of color combinations for 'Living Coral'. There are many other hues and combinations that work.

Here are a Couple of Bedroom Accessories to Inspire You:




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Sunday, May 20, 2018

How to Use Color on the Walls or Ceiling in an Open Concept Room

Notice the Kitchen Ceiling is in the Same Color Family as the Walls Outside of the Kitchen Area
They've Provided Continuity by Bringing the Main Room Colors into the Kitchen Design
Photo Via Pixabay
Most newer homes are designed so that the main rooms combine or flow directly into one another. Although popular, it can be a challenge to decide how to create a cohesive color scheme.

Here are Three Tips to Review:

1. Choose Your "Neutral Color" and Use it On All the Rooms that Open to Each Other

A neutral color doesn't have to be white, beige, gray or tan. When we think about a neutral color, we tend to think 'light' colors, however, your neutral color can also be a bold color.

The main tip in choosing your base color is to use it on all the rooms that flow together in an open area.

Once you've established your base neutral, you're free to create separations in the space using elements or furnishings in the room.

As an example, if a living room opens up to the kitchen, establish your base color for the walls in both rooms then define the spaces using color in other décor aspects. The couches could be lighter and more neutral with darker walls, while the counter tops could be darker if the kitchen cupboards are lighter.

Once you establish a base color for the walls and floors, the rest of the room becomes an effort in matching and binding the elements together.

Notice the Wall Color Between the Two Spaces is the Same
Check out the Ceilings - Because of the Dividing White Beam, a Different Ceiling color Works
Photo Via Pixabay
2. If You Prefer Different Wall Colors in Each of the Defined Spaces that are Open to Each Other Choose Colors in the Same Color Family or Color Temperature

If choosing just one color flowing between your open space rooms is simply not to your liking, then consider choosing colors in the same tones.

As an example, choose a darker shade of a particular color for one aspect of the room, and a lighter shade of the same color for the other open area.

Don't forget the ceiling. Rather than going with a standard white ceiling, depending upon the design of your room, you could use an even lighter shade of your chosen color for the ceiling.
As an example, in a living room kitchen combined space, you could use a dark grey for the living room walls and two shades down for the kitchen color. For the shared ceiling between the two spaces, bring the grey even lighter, perhaps four shades down from the darkest shade you've selected. With this example, you've stayed in the grey family, yet provided distinctive color differences between the two rooms and tied them together using the ceiling.
With a cohesive floor and ceiling flowing through the space, walls in the same tone but different in shade still work nicely without leaving one feeling overwhelmed.

This Design Opens to Several Rooms
They've used Various Shades in the Same Color Temperature
to Create Cohesiveness and Separation - Photo Via Pixabay
3. When You're Not Sure Whether a Room Flows from One to Another

One of the difficult things people find about an open concept space is, are the rooms in fact, open to each other.

In other words, a room is open to another yet not visible from every angle and thus you're unsure if it's considered a separate space.

The solution to this is 'Sightlines". Stand in a room, and determine what other rooms can be seen when you're in it and repeat this for all rooms. If there's an open connection to another room, then you need to be cognizant of color flow.

If you're standing in a room and the only way you can see another room is through a door, that doesn't count as 'open to the other space'. It doesn't mean you should go hog-wild with color differentials, it merely means you're not obligated to consider the flow as carefully as you would with adjoining rooms.

The bottom line, don't be afraid of color. Take your time to determine how your rooms connect together, then decide what system works best for your open concept spaces; one color connecting all walls or various shades in the same family.


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