Monday, March 19, 2018

Reviewing Locking Stitch Markers

Locking stitch markers.
People who crochet and knit know that accuracy plays a role in having a good-looking finished product. I have crocheted off and on for years but only just discovered these fabulous and inexpensive stitch markers. I have noticed that using these little gadgets improved the looks of my finished items immediately and gives them a more professional appearance. Stitch markers completely take the guesswork out of the next round or next row.


Locking Stitch Markers


While watching a video crochet tutorial, the talented crochet artist was using stitch markers to mark the beginning of her round.
Note: when you crochet in circles, such as some ponchos, slippers, etc, that is called a round. Round is a row that connects the end to the beginning. 
The light bulb went on. That was a huge Aha moment for me. I've always had trouble connecting the rounds correctly - ending up with too many or too few stitches, or having a section that doesn't look like the other sections.

This flower is an example. It may be a very small issue that some would not notice, but the inconsistency in the appearance bothers me. The arrow shows where I joined the row, but didn't join it to the correct stitch. Every time I look at the flower, I notice that irregularity.


The little green stitch is not joined to the correct stitch

Prior to owning these little gadgets, I'd typically not mark the stitch at all. That led to problems with the finished item not looking correct (like the photo above). Or I'd use items like a paperclip or a piece of yarn to mark a stitch.  The problems I had with using those things were that I'd end up crocheting over the piece of yarn and make a mess. Or the paperclip would snag my item... or just fall out of the place it was meant to mark. 

Using stitch markers has already improved the looks of my finished items. 

I prefer the little plastic "safety pin" (locking) type. They stay in place, don't snag the yarn, and are easy to use. You simply use it like a safety pin, marking the first stitch in a round (which typically is the stitch you join the last stitch of the round to). 



Of course, there are other varieties if you don't care for the locking style. Other styles include: split ring, bulb safety pin, and even bulb safety pins with Swarovski crystals - for a little bling with your yarn.
Crystaletts stitch makers

Related Links:


Bev Owens shares a review of the Crochet Plain Blanket Pattern. It is a gorgeous two-color plaid blanket. In that review, she shares how to find both the free written pattern and the video tutorial. I agree with Bev, Yarnspirations and The Crochet Crowd are great places to get wonderful crochet patterns and instructions.

Wednesday Elf shares a review of a book Baby Crochet. I know that the internet is a quick and easy place to obtain crochet patterns and instructions, but I've had favorite crochet patterns that are lost because the site is no longer available. Avoid that problem with your own printed copy of the crochet patterns. 

My crochet adventures are located on my own blog Treasures, Travel, and Tales. There you can find an eclectic collection of how I spend my time, as well as the crochet flower pattern review from the photo above. You can also find a post about my newest passion, round loom knitting. Making hats for the grandbabies is great fun!


Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article.

3 comments:

  1. What perfect timing, Dawn Rae. I have this item on my shopping list as we speak. I have used the same lock stitch markers for several years and just this week the last one broke and I have been reduced to using paper clips (which do, indeed, SNAG). Will be replacing my locking stitch markers THIS week. :)

    Thanks so much for sharing my Baby Crochet pattern book review.

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  2. While it has been a while since I crocheted, I very much remember the stress of trying to identify the beginning stitch in a row for the end stitch. These makers would definitely make things easier and they look lightweight enough that they would not "drag" or pull the piece while you are working.

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  3. That's a handy gadget. You have a detailed eye to see the problem you see in the above flower, but I do get what you mean about being accurate when tackling projects. I haven't crocheted in decades, but wow, it's so much fun and very addictive.

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