Showing posts with label oral health. Show all posts
Showing posts with label oral health. Show all posts

Wednesday, October 12, 2022

The Best Dentist Approved, Inexpensive, 5-Mode Electric Toothbrush

I have been using Oral-B or Philips Sonicare ultrasonic toothbrushes for many years, at my dentist’s recommendation. In August, I replaced my old, expensive ultrasonic toothbrush with an excellent and surprisingly inexpensive model (from a lesser-known brand), which has smaller brush heads that fit into hard-to-reach areas, soft, rounded bristles that are gentle on my aging gums, and a choice of five brushing modes.

Even though my new Dnsly electric toothbrush had great customer reviews and was highly recommended by a well-known and respected YouTube influencer whose product recommendations I have come to trust, I was still a bit skeptical about the quality of such an inexpensive product. However, my oral health team was impressed with the state of my teeth and gums during my routine dental cleaning and checkup 10 days ago. I'm delighted that my new Dnsly has been dental hygienist- and dentist-approved.

I'm excited to share my product review of this terrific electric toothbrush set, which comes with seven regular brush heads, an interdental brush head and a fitted case for storage and travel and costs less than $30 at time of publication. Update 10/24/22—the entire set now costs less than $25 on Amazon!

Dnsly Electric Toothbrush With Custom Travel Case, Protective Cover and 8 Brush Heads

Why the Dnsly Electric Toothbrush Is a "Best Buy" For Savvy Consumers

Here are some of the key features that make this Dnsly Electric Toothbrush Set With Replacement Brush Heads and Travel Case a smart purchase.

40,000 VPM for Effective Cleaning and Plaque Removal

Although the American Dental Association says that both manual and electric toothbrushes can clean teeth effectively when using the correct brushing technique, clinical studies have shown that “electric toothbrushes, which combine ultrasonic and sonic (or acoustic and mechanic) actions, may have the most promising effect on good oral health” compared to manual toothbrushes.1 

On the Amazon product page, the manufacturer refers to this electric toothbrush mostly as "sonic" but also as "ultra sonic." It vibrates at up to 40,000 VPM (vibrations per minute), which is in the same ballpark as many ultrasonic toothbrush models from Philips Sonicare and Oral-B.

Digel, I., Kern, I., Geenen, E. M., & Akimbekov, N. (2020). Dental plaque removal by ultrasonic toothbrushes. Dentistry Journal, 8(1), 28. https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8010028

Choice of Five Brushing Modes

There are five tiny LED lights down the front of the handle labeled W, C, S, P and M, respectively, that allow you to choose among the following brushing modes to customize your oral health care routine:

  • White mode (W): strong vibration helps whiten and brighten teeth by removing surface stains.
  • Clean mode (C): medium vibration for routine cleaning / twice-daily brushing.
  • Sensitive mode (S): gentle vibration for first-time electric toothbrush users or those with sensitive teeth and gums.
  • Polish mode (P): stong vibration/invert frequency helps polish and brighten teeth.
  • Massage mode (M): gentle vibration/invert frequency for gum massage and increased circulation to improve the health of your gums.
    • Note: I could not find any information on what "invert frequency" means (or does) in the context of electric toothbrushes.

Just press the large Power on/off button (inside the gold circle) repeatedly to cycle through the different modes. The nice thing is that it will remember the mode you used last and return to that setting automatically the next time you press the Power button. 

I have used the Clean, White and Massage modes so far. I think the White mode is gentle enough for daily use, thanks to the soft, rounded bristles on the brush heads.

2-Minute Smart Timer With 30-Second Pauses and Auto Shutoff

Most dentists recommend brushing your teeth for 2–3 minutes, or 30–45 seconds per quadrant. This Dnsly Electric Toothbrush pauses after each 30-second interval to let you know it's time to move on to the next quadrant, then shuts off automatically after two minutes.

7 Brush Heads and 1 Interdental Brush

The American Dental Association recommends that you replace toothbrushes, or brush heads for an electric toothbrush, every three to four months (or sooner, if the bristles are visibly frayed). 

The Dnsly brush heads have blue bristles at the top and bottom that, with use, gradually fade from blue to white  as a helpful reminder to discard and replace the brush head.

I really like the smaller brush heads and the thin, pointed, interdental brush head with white bristles, since both make it easier to get into tight, hard-to-reach areas. The interdental brush is also great for cleaning around and in between dental braces.

The DuPont bristles with rounded tips are gentle on gums and enamel, which is another reason I decided to try this set.

30-Day Rechargeable Battery Life

A full charge, which takes 4 hours, lasts for at least 30 days, based on brushing for two minutes twice a day.

USB Charging (Charging Cable Included)

The included USB cable can be plugged into any socket with a USB interface, such as a car, laptop or phone charger adapter or power bank socket. You can keep both the cable and an inexpensive USB wall charger/plug adapter in the bathroom for when the battery needs charging (roughly once a month).

The Dnsly electric toothbrush has a low battery indicator that lets you know when it's time to recharge it. It also automatically shuts off after the battery has been fully charged to prevent overcharging.

Fitted Travel Case and Protective Brush Head Cover

The hard plastic, fitted toothbrush travel case has molded sections to hold the handle, one brush head and the interdental brush head. There is also a space-saving clear, hard plastic brush head cover if you want to travel with just the handle and one brush head, rather than the larger, fitted storage case that also holds the interdental brush head.

IPX7 Waterproof

The IPX7 Waterproof rating means your Dnsly electric toothbrush can survive immersion in water up to 1 meter deep for 30 minutes without damage.

You can thoroughly clean the entire brush with soap under hot running water and even brush your teeth while you are taking a shower, if you wish.

Two Color Choices

I purchased this set in black, but there is also a pink Dnsly electric toothbrush set with 8 brush heads and travel case that is identical to the black version, except that it comes with three types of brush heads and the bristles are pink and yellow.

Less Than $25 for the Entire Set

At just $24.29 for the black set ($26.09 for the pink and white set) with free shipping for Amazon Prime members as of 10/24/22, this Dnsly set delivers a huge bang for the buck.

You can also get a set of two Dnsly sonic toothbrushes, one black and one pink, with 8 color-coordinated brush heads (four of each color), 2 interdental brushes and 2 clear brush head covers (but no fitted travel cases) on Amazon for just $34.99. Having two sets in different colors makes it easy for spouses, partners, siblings, roommates, etc. who use them to tell which toothbrush is theirs.

Inexpensive Replacement Brush Heads

Replacement brush heads for Philips Sonicare and Oral-B ultrasonic toothbrush models tend to be expensive. At the time of this post's publication, a set of 7 Dnsly black toothbrush replacement heads costs just $8.89 and a set of 7 Dnsly pink and white toothbrush replacement heads costs just $6.99. 

Each set of replacement brushes includes three "daily" brush heads, three "hard" brush heads with firmer bristles and one interdental brush. The savings on not only the initial toothbrush set but also the replacement brushes was a major selling point for me.

Features Not Included in the Dnsly Electric Toothbrush Set

Even though this set is excellent and a tremendous value, there are a few features that some of my previous Oral-B and Philips Sonicare ultrasonic toothbrushes had that the Dnsly does not.

No Charging Base

The only way to charge the Dnsly is with a USB cable (included). While many people prefer this method, some may prefer having a dedicated charging base plugged in near the bathroom sink.

Since hearing several respected medical and dental experts advise "don't brush where you flush," I have started storing my toothbrush in my bedroom instead of my bathroom anyway, so the USB charging requirement isn't an issue for me.

No Battery Charge Level Indicator

My last Oral-B ultrasonic toothbrush had four stacked LED lights on the handle to indicate how much charge was left. Since I used to store the toothbrush on its charging base, however, I never looked at it unless I was traveling for an extended period.

The Dnsly's low battery indicator works fine for my purposes.

No 3-Minute Timer Option

I liked the choice of 2-minute (30 second intervals) or 3-minute (45-second intervals) brushing times on my pricy Oral-B model. However, if I want to spend a bit more time on certain areas, it's easy enough to press the mode button of my choice to resume brushing after the 2-minute automatic shutoff.

Note: None of my Oral-B or Philips Sonicare toothbrushes had bluetooth connectivity or wireless fast charging, and neither does my new Dnsly model. However, one or both of these features are built into many of the newer models from these leading brands.

The Perfect Travel Toothbrush

Even if you don't want to replace your current ultrasonic toothbrush, this very inexpensive Dnsly set would be great to keep in your carry-on luggage for traveling, thanks to its long battery life, convenient USB charging, toothbrush travel case and protective brush head cover.

A Great, Affordable Gift Under $25

This Dnsly electric toothbrush set would make a great gift for anyone who is currently using a manual toothbrush, wears braces, is a college student, or has difficulty getting their current toothbrush into hard-to-reach places.

It also makes a great stocking stuffer. No one would guess that this set, complete with travel case, brush head cover, seven brush heads with fading bristle replacement indicators, interdental brush head and USB charging cable, costs less than $25!


The Best Dentist Approved, Inexpensive, 5-Mode Electric Toothbrush by Margaret Schindel

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Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article. “As an Amazon Associate I (we) earn from qualifying purchases.”


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Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Dr. Gingiva Toothpaste: A Review

A Toothpaste for Sensitive Gums

Dr. Gingiva Toothpaste: A Review
Photo © B. Radisavljevic
It's hard to review a product as ordinary as toothpaste.  I'm not one of those cheery TV promoters that gets really bubbly about everyday household products. I use them and when I like a product, I keep using it.

I have difficult teeth with deep pockets in my gums that need special deep cleaning every three months. The process of brushing my teeth often leaves me with bleeding gums around my worst tooth.  In the past few months I have tried many different kinds of toothpastes.

A Search for the Right Toothpaste


I used to use The Dirt regularly for a long time. It's a toothpowder which I reviewed about a year ago here. I didn't get any new cavities during that year, but my gums started bleeding on and off near my problem tooth as the deep pocket got harder to clean. So after I ran out of my last order of The Dirt, I decided to try the sample packs of toothpaste my dentist was giving away.

First I tried Colgate Enamel Health Fresh Mint Flavor. I really enjoyed its cool flavor. Like The Dirt, it was supposed to strengthen my tooth enamel and polish my teeth. But also like The Dirt, it it did not address bleeding gums. Still I went looking for it on Amazon because I really liked the taste. When I got to Amazon I discovered Dr. Gingiva Toothpaste in the suggested products. I started comparing ingredients.

What's Different about Dr. Gingiva Toothpaste?


Colgate Enamel Health's active ingredient is sodium fluoride. The active ingredient in Dr. Gingiva is stannous fluoride. According to the Oral B web site information, of the two, only stannous fluoride protects against tartar buildup, gingivitis, erosion, and sensitivity. It also protects the teeth against plaque buildup by keeping plaque from sticking to the teeth. It keeps the bacteria that cause gingivitis from breeding in your mouth.

Another thing that made me want to try this was the addition of Chinese herbs that also addressed gum health. It's flavored with spearmint -- my very favorite mint, so I was pretty sure I would like using it. The customer reviews were almost all favorable, so I went ahead and ordered one package. I could have gotten a sale price by ordering four before June 15, 2019, but I wanted to be sure I liked it first.

My order came three days ago. Dr. Gingiva agrees with my mouth so far. I like the taste. My teeth feel very clean. So far my gums are not bleeding, but only time will tell if that lasts. They didn't bleed every day before -- only sometimes.

I do want to share two other things you should know. First, there is a warning that your teeth may take on a slight greenish tinge that a dentist would be able to remove. So far that hasn't bothered the reviewers.

The other thing you should know is that the reviewers are very motivated to give positive reviews. The company offers a reward of two free tubes of toothpaste, including tubes of their other brands -- Teagrance for bad breath and LMZ Herbal for toothache treatment. The customer chooses. So keep that in mind when you read the reviews. Of course, if one doesn't like the toothpaste, one probably wouldn't want more of it -- even if it's free. My offer came with my order. I did not receive any free toothpaste. I paid for the tube I'm reviewing here. Instructions for reviewing the product on Amazon came with my order.

Disclaimer: This product has not been proven to prevent or cure any disease. If you need oral health advice, be sure to consult your dentist or oral hygienist..





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Thursday, August 20, 2015

SLS-Free Toothpaste and Why I Brush With Tooth Soap

"I'm Going to Wash Your Mouth Out With Soap!"


Did your mom ever say that to you? I hope not, but if she did, she was actually onto something. In fact, after extensive research, I no longer use toothpaste. Instead, I brush my teeth with tooth soap!

SLS-Free Toothpaste and Why I Brush With Tooth Soap
Most of my life, I had a major problem with mouth ulcers. If you've ever had those white, painful sores on the inside of your cheek or lips that make it difficult to eat, then you know what I'm talking about. Several years ago, I started searching for a cause for mouth ulcers and I came across several articles about SLS in toothpaste. A good number of people like me were reporting that using an SLS-free toothpaste put an end to their mouth sores.

I was interested, in fact I was thrilled. But what toothpaste should I use? And where could I find toothpaste without SLS, one that was safe to use? My research continued.

SLS stands for sodium lauryl sulfate which is used in many products from toothpaste to industrial cleaners. Why? Because SLS causes a reaction in those products that makes them foamy or sudsy when they're used. But get this. It's also used as a skin irritant in testing of products made to heal skin conditions.

What about other potentially harmful ingredients in toothpaste? Did you ever wonder about the “Do Not Swallow” warning on the label or why many toothpastes say they are not to be used by children under six-years of age?

Many of the ingredients in toothpaste can be dangerous. For instance, there's silica. Medicinenet.com defines silica this way: “The chief component of sand and a substance responsible for lung disease and cancer.” Read the label on your own toothpaste and I’m guessing you’re going to think twice before you squeeze that tube tonight on your way to bed!

But back to SLS-free toothpaste and why I brush with tooth soap.

My research eventually led me to tooth soap which at that time was expensive and somewhat hard to find. Since then, I make an effort to put fewer ingredients that I can't pronounce into my body. A few of the "natural" alternatives for brushing that I've tried are these (prices are subject to change):

* The Tooth Soap brand is what originally sold me on tooth soap. Get a 4-ounce jar of peppermint shreds for $23.86 with Amazon Prime.

 * Squigle Tooth Builder, Sensitive, 4.4 oz Toothpaste, $9.50 with Prime. Ingredients: 36% Natural Xylitol, water, calcite, glycerin, poloxamer, cellulose gum, Methocel, calcium propionate, lactoferrin. I like this, but it doesn't make my teeth feel as smooth as they get with tooth soap. And it's expensive.

* Xyli-White Toothpaste 6.4 oz $3.99 add-on item. Ingredients: Water, xylitol, hydrated silica, glycerin, sorbitol, sodium bicarbonate, sodium carbonate, sodium coco-sulfate, carrageenan, tea tree leaf oil, peppermint oil, spearmint oil, papain, potassium sorbate. I've tried this and it's actually pretty good (discounting the silica on the ingredient list) and it's cheaper than most on this list but, again, it doesn't clean as well as tooth soap.

* Tom's Toothpaste. Tom's has a reputation for using natural ingredients in its products. Unfortunately for me, they use sodium lauryl sulfate as a dispersing agent, so I have to eliminate this product from my "recommended" list. Apparently there is a low-sudsing variety without SLS, so look for that and give it a try.

* Coconut Oil Toothpaste. I have tried brushing my teeth with coconut oil, fresh from the kitchen, and that wasn't a very satisfying experience, though your results may vary. Additionally, I tried a coconut oil toothpaste in a tube and had mixed results. Why mixed? Because since coconut oil is responsive to temperature, during cold weather it became partially solid and was nearly impossible to squeeze out of the tube, so I became very frustrated and quit using it until summer.

* Today's winner and my overall recommendation: Uncle Harry's Tooth Soap (peppermint) $8.99 for a 2-ounce jar, free shipping. This is something I found recently, started using it a few weeks ago, and I really like it! The price is right (those 2 ounces will last a long time), I love that it's a whipped formula and not a shred like the original Tooth Soap brand, and my teeth are getting much cleaner than they did with the xylitol toothpaste I previously used. Recommended!

You might be asking yourself, does tooth soap taste like soap? Well yes, it actually does. The Uncle Harry's tooth soap that I've been using contains organic peppermint essential oil so when I open the jar, it's the minty fresh smell that I notice. It doesn't take much soap to brush, just a dab on the tip of my toothbrush, so my mouth doesn't fill with suds and spread the soap taste to my taste buds. Plus, by now I've gotten used to brushing with soap and it doesn't bother me a bit. You'll get used to it, too.

Bottom line, I brush my teeth with tooth soap, always SLS-free, and my mouth ulcer problem has disappeared. I no longer wake up with an icky mouth and a coating on my teeth. Instead, my teeth feel smooth and clean after I brush. And, (did I mention?) no more mouth ulcers with SLS-free tooth soap! It worked for me and I hope it will work for you.

(To learn more about SLS, visit this page at Mercola.com.  It's a very interesting topic to research.)

--Susan Deppner





Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article. “As an Amazon Associate I (we) earn from qualifying purchases.”


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