Showing posts with label house plant. Show all posts
Showing posts with label house plant. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 25, 2023

The Sarracenia Or Pitcher Plant Reviewed

 

Sarracenia Or Pitcher Plant

 

My husband and I have recently developed a fascination for these carnivorous plants. 

I have been gardening and owning house plants for decades yet it has only been in the last few years that I became interested in these plants. It just shows that when it comes to gardening you never stop learning! 

I knew nothing about these carnivorous plants and each one is slightly different so I applied the same methods I do when first growing any plant to learn about its habits, origin, position, water, feed and soil needs and do my best to help it thrive. 

For me the introduction to Sarracenia came when talking to a very knowledgeable man at a plant fair with a huge display of carnivorous plants from his nursery. As I have said before most gardeners are only too happy to discuss plants with anyone who will listen, so I listened, asked questions and gained a huge amount of insight and knowledge and then I bought a plant from him. 


The Sarracenia is also commonly known as the Pitcher plant, most likely due to the shape of its leaves. It is a fascinating plant and at the plant fair both adults and children were crowding around to see and understand more about these plants.

Sarracenia Or Pitcher Plant Outside

 

Characteristics of the Sarracenia Plant

Native to North America, this quite beautiful and striking carnivorous plant is known for trapping insects in its distinctive pitcher shaped leaves.

The Sarracenia plant possesses several distinctive features. The most striking trait is its pitchers, which are modified leaves that form long, tube-like structures. They come in various colours such as green, red and yellow which gives it a quite pretty appearance.  

 The inside of these pitchers secretes a compelling nectar that attracts insects. Once they land on it the slippery surfaces make escape very difficult and the hairs that point downward prevent insects from climbing out. Hence the insects are trapped and cannot escape and without delving into the gory details, become nutrients for the plant. 

It is worth mentioning that the Sarracenia plant’s pitchers are not only used for carnivorous purposes, they also act as water collectors. They accumulate rainwater, which not only provides hydration  but also serves as a habitat for beneficial organisms such as mosquito larvae-eating aquatic species.


Care and Growing Conditions For The Pitcher Plant

To ensure the healthy growth of your Sarracenia plant, it is essential to provide it with the appropriate care and growing conditions. Here are some very important factors to take account of for the plant to survive.

Sarracenia Or Pitcher Plant on windowsill

 

Position Of Sarracenia Plant

Sarracenia plants thrive in bright, indirect sunlight and need about five hours sunlight each day. However we need to be careful as too much strong sun can burn the leaves

 So in the house somewhere that is a sunny windowsill but has filtered light would be perfect.

 In the summer time we also take our pitcher plant outside during the day onto the patio on a saucer filled with rainwater to enjoy the semi shade semi sun conditions we have there. We do leave it out in light rain so it can naturally collect its rainwater but we do bring it in if we get heavy downpours and always bring it back inside in the evening. 


Sarracenia Ideal Temperatures

Sarracenia plants are generally cold hardy and can tolerate quite a wide range of temperatures. However, they prefer cooler conditions, with a temperature range of between 60-85°F (15-29°C) during the day and about 45-55°F (7-13°C) at night. 

 So if you know that your house gets hotter than this do provide shelter for partial shade. This could be a simple piece of cardboard, other plants around the Pitcher plant or a screen of some kind.  


Watering Needs of Sarracenia

Pitcher plants must have moist soil. They must not be allowed to dry out. However, it is very important we never use tap water on a Sarracenia, it can and does kill the plant. 

Rather than tap water always use rainwater ideally, or if you cannot get that, then distilled water.

We do get periods of drought here now, so when it does rain we gather up the rainwater into bottles to save for use on our carnivorous plants.

  

             

Preferred Humidity For Pitcher Plants

 Sarracenia plants prefer higher humidity levels, ideally between 50 to 70%. It is not always easy to give the plants this level of humidity all year round and I find can be one of the most difficult things to get right. 

 However the most inexpensive solution is to put a saucer full of pebbles filled with rainwater under the plant to help increase levels of humidity. This way the plant is not waterlogged but gets the benefit of localised humidity. 

It is often good for plants to live together so that they benefit each other so your pitcher plant can live next to say a Spider Plant or a Banana plant or any houseplant as long as they are in separate pots.

If you can afford a humidifier then that is a great solution. We do not have one and the saucer of water works well enough, but you have to remember to keep it topped up with rainwater.

 

Sarracenia Or Pitcher Plant with houseplants


Soil Requirements for  Sarracenia

Most of us will grow Sarracenia as a houseplant indoors most of the year, so it will be growing in a pot. 

The soil we use is crucial for the health and vitality of the Sarracenia plant and it is very particular. If you have one of these plants it is important not to deviate away from these soil requirements. 

Sarracenia plants must have acidic soil to grow well and thrive. So the soil must be pH of 4.0 to 5.0.

 This acidic ph level replicates their original natural habitat, which is often boggy and acidic due to decaying organic matter.

The soil must be acidic and very well drained, porous and loose with good aeration. Ideally it will be a mix of sphagnum peat moss, sand and perlite. This helps to prevent the plant becoming waterlogged which it dislikes and helps toward good root formation. 

We do not need to use any fertilisers, in fact it would be detrimental to the Sarracenia. Fertilisers often contain chemicals and minerals that will harm or even kill the plant. 

Due to the fact they are carnivorous plants, Sarracenia plants do not require any additional fertilisation, all the nutrients they require come from the insects they attract and capture.

Do not worry if your pitcher plant leaves goes thin. We were told that this is when they have insects inside the pitcher and are digesting them! A little gruesome but equally fascinating. 

Ours is pretty thin at present as it has recently been eating very well! Makes me wish that I went thin when I ate! 

Sarracenia Or Pitcher Plant tubes


So while there is a lot to learn to successfully grow these plants and I am certainly still on a steep learning cure myself, they are truly fascinating. 

They also do a wonderful job of keeping down the insects and recently ours was extremely helpful in dealing with an infestation of a type of whitefly on my new strawberry mint. We simply placed the Sarracenia next to the mint plant and within 2 days all the flies were gone! 

I know of people who keep a host of carnivorous plants in their greenhouses in order to keep insect pests at bay and apparently they work really well.  


 

The Sarracenia plant, with its fascinating characteristics, quite pretty coloured tubes and carnivorous nature, is an intriguing addition to our house plant collection. With care and attention it will reward us with an unusual and intriguing plant for many years. While maybe not a complete beginners houseplant, if you are prepared to learn it is certainly a wonderful plant to own. It was our first pitcher plant but I do not think it will be the last ! 


More House Plant Reviews

 Reviewing How To Take Care Of Your House Plants On Vacation

Swiss Cheese Plant Or Monstera Reviewed As A House Plant And Fashion Trend




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Tuesday, February 22, 2022

Swiss Cheese Plant Reviewed House Plant And Fashion Trend

Swiss Cheese Plant

There was always a Swiss Cheese Plant in our home when I was growing up. I did not know then that its Latin name is Monstera, but as a striking and larger than average house plant, it is certainly appropriate. As a child, I loved its jungle feel and the fact that it was bigger than me! 

It is a beautiful and stunning indoor plant. In the 1970's it was a staple houseplant in many people's homes and was a background feature along with other plants. 

Now it is again a very popular houseplant but it has taken more of a center stage being used as a real statement plant in a prominent position and even as a fashion trend. 


Swiss Cheese Plant
Monstera Leaves and aerial roots.

 

The Beauty Of A Swiss Cheese Plant

Grown as an indoor house plant this plant can grow to about  3 to 8 foot so it is a substantial house plant. 

The leaves are pliable and very soft to touch and a pretty light or dark green glossy colour. 

When the leaves are young they are of a solid heart shape. As they grow older the leaf develops splits in the leaf and this process gives it its name as it can look a little like swiss cheese. 

It can grow large but we can also keep it at a manageable size to fit the space. Though if you can let it grow as large as it will it looks even more stunning.


Swiss Cheese Plant Split leaf
Mature Monstera Leaf With Split Against My Hand 

Native Growing Conditions Of The Monstera Or Swiss Cheese Plant 

It is often useful and interesting to learn where the plants we have in our homes come from and what their native conditions are so we can better replicate them and keep them happy in our homes. 

In native conditions in Central and South America, it grows under large trees in a jungle. In natural conditions, it can grow to up to seventy foot in height but it will not reach anywhere near this in a pot indoors. We can expect our plant to grow to approximately no bigger than eight foot if left to grow as big as it can. 

Monstera does like to climb and has aerial roots which grow downwards from its main stem. As a houseplant, we can help it mimic its natural conditions by putting in strong support like a stake. As it can grow quite floppy and sprawling otherwise it can brace itself against the stake and do what it would in a jungle pushing itself onto a neighbouring tree or tangled vine for support as it grows upwards. 

In its native conditions, this plant can flower a lovely white flower but it very rarely does as a houseplant. I have never seen a flower. So when you grow this plant indoors grow it for its beautiful glossy leaves of shades of green from light fresh green to mid and then dark green. 


Swiss Cheese Plant
Swiss Cheese Plant or Monstera

Care of The Swiss Cheese Plant.

For such a big statement plant it requires remarkably little care. If you do not think you are good with houseplants then this is one that is hard to get wrong. I think it is one of the easiest plants I have. 

It likes moist soil but never waterlogged, so regular consistent watering is best. As usual with house plants the best guide is the stick a finger about an inch into the soil if it is wet do not water but if dry or in this case nearly dry then water. 

The soil should be water retentive but not too claggy so a good houseplant and compost mix on the neutral to acid side is best. 

In its native situation it grows in the shade of large trees so do not place this plant in a sunny position. It needs a bright but shaded spot. It can cope with a few hours of the morning sun but absolutely no more than that. 

As its large leaves can get dusty over time I like to take a cotton wool ball soaked in warm water and just gently wipe across the leaves. I only do this when they look dusty. This used to be one of my jobs when I was a child and I still enjoy doing it. 

Monstera likes to be warm and loves humidity so an ideal situation is a heated bright bathroom where the light is filtered via blinds or obscured window panes and where the family take showers or baths.

Feed it regularly with Baby Bio or similar once a month and you will have a happy plant.       

  

 

Swiss Cheese Plant Issues 

It can have pests and diseases such as whitefly, mealybug, spider mites, powdery mildew to name a few but I have never had an issue and if you keep it in conditions it likes it will be healthy. 

These infestations will rarely kill this plant anyway but look unsightly and weaken it so we have to control them and in this case I would use an insecticide or fungicide depending on the issue.

There are two things to watch for with the leaves. If you see a leaf or many leaves turning black then it is effectively that the plant has been sunburnt or scorched by being kept in a sunny place for too long. 

The individual leaf cannot recover from this so the best thing is the prune away that leaf from the bottom of the stem. This will only happen if it has been exposed to too much direct sunlight so is easily avoided. 

If you see the leaves turning yellow then we have overwatered. we must stop watering immediately, turn the pot and drain off any excess water and leave to dry. If very waterlogged we may be best repotting the plant into fresh dry soil and starting again with light watering. 

While it likes moisture it hates sitting in wet soil so this can easily be avoided by only watering when the plant is nearly dry.

All parts of this plant are toxic to pets so it is best to keep it well away from them. Another reason a bathroom may be the best spot.

The plant featured here was one I bought as a sale plant a few months ago and I had to do a lot of pruning away of damaged leaves and sun scorched leaves. It was very large but uncared for.  I have left one scorched leaf for you to see. This will need to be pruned away at the base. The plant was also unstable in its pot and rocking from its roots so I repotted in a new deeper pot so it is stable. My next job is to install firm support so it can climb. 

I reduced the plant considerably in size but as you can see there is a lot of new growth and one leaf is already mature enough to have developed splits. So I was really happy I rescued this plant! 


Monstera young and old leaves
Swiss Cheese Plant old sun damaged leaf next to new young leaf. 

Monstera In Fashion Trend

Who would have thought this plant would have become so fashionable. I tend not to grow plants indoors or outdoors for fashion trends but because I love them. 

However, the trend is there for this plant to be used in wedding flowers, as centerpieces and large statement plants in prestigious offices.

People even cut a single stem with a large leaf on it and use it much as flower decoration in a vase of water, where it does look very striking.

It really suits an environment that is minimalist, clean and unfussy or where flowers would look too much. Its large size and dark glossy leaves do add understated style and substance.

There is even Monstera wallpaper which can look amazing as a real statement in the right place.


The Swiss Cheese Plant was so popular in the 1970's and then like many houseplants fell out of favour. However, now there is a thankfully increased appreciation of the beauty of houseplants and how good they are for us as well as looking beautiful and enhancing our home decor. 

Fashion and trends come and go but I hope the love and appreciation for houseplants are here to stay now and I will never fall out of love with this amazing plant. It will grace our home with its simple stunning good looks for a very long time. 




More Gardening And Houseplant Reviews

Care Of The Intriguing Carnivorous Venus Fly Trap House Plant Reviewed.


Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article. “As an Amazon Associate, Ebay (EPN) and/or Esty (Awin) Affiliate, I (we) earn from qualifying purchases.”


Sunday, October 17, 2021

Care Of The Carnivorous Venus Fly Trap House Plant Reviewed.

 

Carnivorous Venus Fly Trap House Plant
Venus Fly Trap
 

I am the recent caretaker of a Venus Fly Trap house plant.

I wasn't sure I wanted one of these carnivorous houseplants plants but hubby has wanted one for a long time so I purchased it for his birthday this year. 

From being really quite indifferent to this particular plant, I have developed a real interest and curiosity about it.

To be fair I had heard they were quite difficult to care for and I wasn't sure I was wanting the task of trying to keep it alive. 

However, I love how it is growing and flourishing in our home and it has been interesting learning all about it. The plant looks happy and has grown and developed well so that gives me joy! 

It is also named the species Dionaea muscipula -though there are many named cultivars with some different looks and habits. Part of the family of carnivorous plants, it only grows in a few places in nature now. Sadly habitat destruction has obliterated it from many of its sites. It can still be seen in the coastal bogs of North and South Carolinas.


Soil Conditions For A Venus Fly Trap

As for most of us, we will keep this plant in a plant pot so we need to copy its natural environment as much as possible. It likes to grow naturally in soil with very low nutrients and dampness all the time. However these days it is not advisable to use endangered peat supplies. So without using at-risk peat mixes you can buy specialist mixes or try the plant in sphagnum peat moss, or fine-milled bark mixed with lime-free horticultural sand or perlite, or just simply in pure sphagnum moss.

Repotting if needed should be done just before the end of winter, so around February for us before all the new regrowth begins.


venus fly trap houseplant



Watering And Feeding Venus Fly Trap

With Venus Fly Traps watering is a fine balance. They do need the soil to be moist but not waterlogged, neither do they wish to dry out.

 So in the growing season, they like to be in a little standing water so I put a saucer under the draining pot and the saucer has a covering of water in it as it simulates the conditions it would have in the wild damp with higher humidity.

During winter the plant should be kept damp but they do not need so much water so I will likely remove the saucer and just make sure the soil is damp to the touch. 

This plant by far prefers rainwater. So I now keep a bucket outside to collect rainwater for this plant. If I forget then I do use tap water that has been left to stand for about 3 days to help dissipate the minerals and chemicals but even so, to be honest, it is not ideal and long term use of tap water is not good for Venus Fly Traps and will kill them.  

Venus Fly Traps which are kept outside will be able to find enough food for themselves. We put ours outside as much as possible on fine sunny days and the rest of the time on our sunny kitchen windowsill with the window mostly open and it certainly found enough food. 

If you really can't do that then it is possible to feed it yourself with freeze-dried mealworms, which can be bought from shops, but it is a specialist skill to read up on a specialist site. To be honest, it is not something I really want to have to do, so we will stick with a sunny open window and putting it outside as much as possible in summer! 

We do not need to use a plant fertilizer on a Venus Fly Trap, it is adapted to grow in nutrient-poor soil and feeding it in this way will only be harmful. 


Position in The Home For A Venus Fly Trap

A Venus Fly Trap will always require a sunny position in its growing season but does not like being in the direct hot sun all day. 

So aim for about 5 hours of bright sunlight. A sunny windowsill with the window open for part of the day is good. However, do not let it get scorched by the sun.

I have also during this summer put it outside in a sheltered sunny spot for a few hours and it really did seem to like that. 

I would also keep it out of reach of small children and pets, not so much that it is any danger to them but constant touching of the plant's traps, which are often fascinating to children,  may cause it to die. 


 


Winter With A Venus Fly Trap

We have not yet been through a winter with our plant but there are a few things to bear in mind for its survival. 

They do need a period of winter dormancy which in the UK is around November to the beginning of March. As they live in our homes, not the wild environment we need to try to replicate that so they need to have somewhere cold to rest.

We will therefore be moving ours from its sunny warm spot on our kitchen windowsill to a colder place in our home. If I had an unheated greenhouse it could go in there but instead, I will move it to a cold windowsill that is north facing. It's the coolest place in our home and I am hoping it will be cold enough. 

I have been warned not to panic during winter as the leaves will turn black and the beautiful little plant will die right back. At this point, we will trim off any dead growth. Then it is just a matter of keeping it damp and waiting for new growth in Spring! 


Information About the "Traps"

As it is a carnivorous plant its method of gaining nutrition is a little more gruesome than with most plants. It first needs to attract its prey which it does by exuding sweet nectar. 

The flies come in and movement triggers the tiny hairs and then the trap snaps shut just like a cage from which the insect cannot escape.

After that digestive enzymes dissolve the insect and use it for nutrition. The traps stay shut for about 5-8 days then open up again to restart the process with the added bonus, if you are a Fly Trap- of the leftover carcass also being used to attract more prey. 

I feel I should say at this point that we have not noticed any more flies coming in due to having this plant. In fact, we probably have less making it past the plant into the house now!

venus fly trap
New Young Traps Forming On Venus Fly Trap


The Cycle Of The Traps

When a trap has opened and closed a few times, probably around five times, it goes black and dies off. For that particular trap, it is the end.

However, before that happens we see several new traps growing to take their place.

At first, I did not think they would grow large enough to keep the plant alive before the older ones died but nature knows what it is doing and the new traps grew and were big enough by the time the older ones died. 

I am more than happy to see now that when I bought it only had 4 traps and now it has double that amount so this shows the plant is happy. Over time and with care it will get better and bigger. 

Children find these Venus Fly Traps fascinating and the book below is a great informative and fun introduction to these amazing little houseplants. 


 


 A Word Of Warning About Venus Fly Traps

If you have one of these fascinating plants it is very important not to test out the traps by putting your finger or a pencil etc inside them. 

While it may seem like fun, to the plant it is torture. Every time the trap shuts it uses up energy and if there is no food in the trap then it has just wasted so much energy. Traps only close about 5 or 6 times before they die so if it is tormented like this with no food it will deplete the plant and eventually the whole plant may die. 

However, you cannot really hurt yourself on this plant. Just avoid touching it as much as possible for its own sake. 


venus fly trap houseplant in front of window
Venus Fly Trap On Sunny Windowsill


So having been initially quite wary of this carnivorous houseplant the Venus Fly Trap, I am now more than fascinated with it and it is an unusual addition to our houseplant collection!


More Gardening And Houseplant Reviews




Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article. “As an Amazon Associate, Ebay (EPN) and/or Esty (Awin) Affiliate, I (we) earn from qualifying purchases.”


Monday, July 19, 2021

Reviewing Care Of Anthurium Or Flamingo Flower House Plants

 

anthurium or flamingo flower houseplant
Stunning Anthurium Or Flamingo Flower Houseplant. 

 
I do love Anthurium. This beautiful house plant has a special place in my heart as the stems and red flowers of this plant were given as a gift as a gorgeous bouquet of stunning flowers to my husband and me as we came to the end of our honeymoon.

We kept these stems and flowers for weeks. So when we were all settled in our home, we decided to buy ourselves an Anthurium plant so that we could keep it always. 

I have to admit I was a little concerned about how I would look after this Flamingo Flower plant as it looks so exotic. I was sure it would need so much looking after!

However, while it does need a little care I was wrong that it needed a lot. 

I commonly knew this plant as a Flamingo Flower but it also has the common names Laceleaf, Painted Tongue Plant and Tail Flower.

Ours has bright red "flowers" although they are not technically flowering, as I will explain later. 

These Flamingo flower plants would grow in a very tropical environment in nature. They have no scent, just their stunning good looks! It is a lush, stunningly beautiful plant that graces any house with a subtle yet distinctly tropical look. Yet I feel most people could care for this plant with relative ease and just a little knowledge and have a gorgeous display in the home. 


anthurium houseplant with lush leaves
Gorgeous Lush Leaves Of Anthurium Houseplant
 

Where To Site An Anthurium Houseplant

Where we position this plant in the house is vitally important and like with many houseplants, if you get that right the rest is really easy. 

We need to grow this plant in a bright position. If it is in direct sunlight it will scorch the leaves. If it is in constant dull light or too much shade, it may slow growth and stop producing its gorgeous flowers.  

The Flamingo plant benefits from a consistent temperature. We will know if the room you have it in is too hot as it will wilt. We need to remove it from the environment and try somewhere a bit cooler to give it a chance to survive. 

The ideal temperature is around 70-90 degrees but in my experience, the average house temperature is perfectly fine. Our house temperature is significantly lower than 90 degrees and our plant does well in our living room where it is generally warm and constant. Ours is positioned where it is not near an open window in case of drafts or cold chills in winter but it does have lots of light.

If your house goes from extreme heat to extreme cold that this plant will suffer badly, but I doubt many of us will do that intentionally in our homes for our own comfort! 

In a warm summer, we can take them outside for a while in daylight hours only but must keep them in a lightly shaded spot and bring them in before dusk.

I sometimes do this during June and July for a couple of hours a couple of times a week if we get a warm dry summer! 


flamingo flower bloom
Heart-Shaped Flower Or Spathe
 On Anthurium

Anthurium House Plant Flowers

Now to explain the "flowers" of this plant. They are very beautiful and shaped like a heart which is rather lovely! The bright red heart shaped structures on our plant do look like flowers but they are not. 

They are in fact waxy leaves and are called spathes. They can come in a gorgeous range of colours from pink, purple, white or red like ours. So if you have one in your home you can usually find one to suit your decor.  However, during this article, we will just call them flowers. 

In order to get those gorgeous waxy leaves that look like flowers, we need to feed the plant a feed with high prosperous content. This is only required about once every month and only during Spring and summer when actively growing. There is no need to use fertiliser in Autumn or winter at all.  

I find the flowers last quite a long time up to several weeks then they gradually dry up and my red one turns a dark brown. I like to trim them off before they start looking unsightly. However, do not just snip them off below the flower head. You need to feel right down the base and cut off low down with a pair of secateurs like these Wolf By Pass Secateurs or a strong pair of scissors. More flowers will soon appear! 


anthurium flower bloom
Anthurium Flower


Soil Conditions For Anthurium Houseplant

They grow naturally either in rich soil humus or on the surface of other plants.

For our purposes of growing this as a house plant, it is best and easiest to pot into a soil that is free draining but not as light as pure cactus soil. It is best in soil that has some water retention but is free draining which means the water will quickly pour through drainage holes. A blend of cactus soil with richer compost and grit would be good. 

However, as I could not get any cactus soil at the time, mine is potted into an ordinary multi-purpose compost that is sifted and mixed with fine grit and it seems to do just fine. 

As with most houseplants if the plant starts to look overcrowded and fills the pot that is the time to re-pot into a larger container. I do try to do this before it starts into new growth in early spring, though with this plant you may only need to do it only every few years.


anthurium or flamingo flower houseplant displayed
Anthurium Flower Houseplant With Other Houseplants

Watering The Flamingo Flower

I only water when the soil is dry. To test this easily simply pop your finger in the soil and if the first part up to your first knuckle joint feels dry,  give it a good watering until the water pours out of the drainage holes. Allow it to drain off completely then place it back into its outer pot.

Ideally, you do not want Flamingo flower houseplants in any standing water. They like a humid atmosphere but from my experience no more humid than is comfortable for us.

 If you want to make it more humid without changing your comfort levels then a saucer with pebbles covered in water underneath the plant will help. We can also grow it together with other houseplants who like similar conditions or are not fussy about conditions and that will also increase humidity for all of them. I have our Anthurium keeping company with our spider plant and I like the contrasting forms and habit. 

We can mist these houseplants lightly as they like humidity but do not overdo it as they will respond badly to being soaked. I only mist once every couple of weeks in warm weather. Bathrooms often have natural humidity but you would also need to make sure the light levels were good for the plant. 

flamingo flower houseplant
Beautiful Flamingo Flower Houseplant


Safety Around the Anthurium Plant And Health Benefits.

It is important to note that these plants are poisonous if eaten or tasted. They can cause swelling of the mouth and organs of the digestive system and severe pain. If you buy one do keep it well out of reach of children and pets. 

The sap can also be an irritant and can irritate your eyes quite badly so I am careful as I have very sensitive skin but it's probably best for anyone to wear gloves when handling a lot or especially when taking cuttings.  Do not rub or touch your eyes or mouth with gloves or your hands until you have washed them.

We have ours on top of a tall cupboard where you can see it and admire it but there is no danger to any visiting children or pets.

For these reasons, I try to keep handling this plant to a minimum. I have not yet taken any cuttings as that means much more contact with the plant and I have super sensitive skin. So far I have just repotted it probably every 3 years.

If you are ever lucky enough to see this plant in the wild, best to admire it visually and do not touch it. 

However, they are also good for our health being excellent plants for helping to purify the air in our homes and offices and can help rid the air of many toxic chemicals such as formaldehyde and ammonia. They are also particularly good to help the air quality if you use technology like printers or photocopiers.  



So to summarize, Anthuriums or Flamingo flower plants are beautiful, stunning looking and will grace any home with a touch of the exotic. They are toxic if eaten and we do need to be careful when handling them due to the sap, but they are good for our health too in helping to purify our air. For such a tropical-looking plant the care is surprisingly easy. As with most houseplants, if you get the position, soil and watering correct the plant will be a gorgeous addition to your home for years to come. 


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