Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Nature's Easter Eggs


Photo Credit: Natural Easter Eggs
You can color me green in terms of lifestyle, but healthy living is really a lovely palette of so many beautiful colors.  With Easter just a few days away, I’ve been considering how I want to apply the colors of the rainbow to create this year’s dyed eggs.  As I searched for holiday decorating ideas, I took a few scenic detours and started reading about chickens and their eggs.  When it comes to making gorgeous shells, the chickens are already several steps ahead of me.  I don’t even need to break out the dye.

As one who is on a quest to grow all of my own food, I currently have a fascination with raising backyard chickens.  My goal is to start with three laying hens this spring.  Along with the search for construction plans to build a chicken coop, I am thoroughly enjoying what I am learning about the different breeds of chickens. 

Did you know you can look at a chicken’s earlobe to potentially determine what color of egg she will lay?  I've not personally checked any earlobes to test that little tidbit of chicken trivia, but you can learn more by watching the short video clip presented in the first article linked below.  Wouldn’t it be fun if we had a similar way of seeing what our future children might look like?  But I digress. 

As I was saying before I interrupted myself, I now know why chickens produce different colored eggs, as well as which breeds to buy if I want to have delicious Easter eggs every day of the year.  Do you know which chickens lay blue, pink, green, or brown eggs?  I do now thanks to several interesting Squidoo articles. 

With the countdown to Easter, let’s have some fun by going on a virtual Easter egg hunt.  Read about Nature’s Easter Eggs and a very doable DIY backyard chicken coop.

Do you raise backyard chickens?  Have you built a hen house?  If so, I would love to read all about it.  Why not write a feature article or review of your top backyard chicken product.  I might even reward you with a basket of your favorite Easter candy.  So what will it be?  Mini robin's eggs?  Peeps?  Did I mention chocolate?

14 comments:

  1. These naturally colored Easter eggs are gorgeous! I bet they would be a lot better for us than the dyed Easter eggs too. I remember the brown eggs from my youth, but I don't believe I have otherwise ever seen anything other than the white eggs at the grocery store. My grandmother would gasp to see how "citified" I have become.

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    1. I am gasping, too. Just kidding. I'm guessing most people have never experienced eggs outside of the grocery aisle. I do plan to have blue and brown eggs. You can come visit. I'll even let you take a look at a chicken's earlobe. :-)

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  2. Oh, yes, I do love the colorful Spring eggs from nature! When I dyed eggs for Easter with my son, I boiled the eggs in water which a variety of vegetables were tossed. Beets, spinach, carrots, and blueberries (a few eggs and one of these in the boiling pot) make pastel beauties! And even tea and coffee works well too!

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    1. You are such a creative mama. I love that you used natural food dyes.

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  3. I had NO idea eggs came in anything except white and brown (I'm SUCH a city kid). What a fascinating article you featured about 'nature's' Easter Eggs. I look forward to seeing pictures of YOUR chicken coop and chickens this Spring.

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    1. I doubt I knew much more until beginning this quest several months ago. The eggs on the farms of my childhood were all white or brown. No fancy colors. I look forward to sharing my coop and hens as things proceed. Just wish the weather would behave. We've had so much snow this month. Makes it hard to work on outside construction projects.

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  4. I'm an old hen (excuse me, I meant old hand) at raising chickens. At one time I had 4 different breeds and 34 chickens. Yes, I even had roosters (I love the sound of crowing in the morning). You'll have a great time raising chickens.

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  5. I'll be counting on you for advice. I, too, love the sound of a rooster's crow at dawn, though I don't anticipate raising any roosters at this time.

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  6. My dad raised chickens. I grew up eating fresh brown eggs. His hens only laid browns though, no pretty pastels. We did occasionally get a nifty extra large egg with an extra yolk.

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    1. That would be so cool to have the surprise of a bonus yolk. Twins! I wish every child could grow up on fresh homegrown food. Thanks for your visit. Appreciated!

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  7. HaHa Coletta, you are funny! Renaissance Woman, thank you for sharing this. I want to have chickens so badly. I can't wait to look to see how in the world one would find a chicken ear.

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    1. Ears to you, Dawn Rae, as you find a way to follow your dream. :-)

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  8. Earlobes...interesting! Not sure I even knew that chickens had earlobes! My eldest daughter and her husband worked a summer at an organic farm, off the grid. They had bottomless chicken coops, and moved the chickens to different pasture daily. It was interesting.

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    1. Ah yes... they call those mobile coops chicken tractors. I'd have to pull up a million cacti to be able to do that here. It is a great way to move the chickens around to fresh grazing areas and to spread their fertilizer.

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