Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Writing Power


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I’ve been thinking a lot about energy lately while composing a new Green Living article.  As I have gone around the house testing various appliances with my Kill A Watt monitor, checking how much power they need to do their thing, I began to think about the amps drawn upon when I am cranking out articles, reviews, and blog posts.

Many of my appliances, such as my refrigerator, are energy stars (as in Energy Star appliances).  They didn’t achieve that status by burning through tons of power over the course of their machine lives.  These are lean running machines.  Just as world class runners have honed their craft to achieve an economy of movement and an optimal use of their body’s energy, so too writers work to find the kind of flow that produces while drawing upon precious resources.

When I was a long distance runner, my breathing and running rhythm didn’t kick in until I had covered three miles.  At that point, the running began to feel good… almost effortless.  My heart, lungs, and muscles found their synchronicity.  They pumped as one. 

If I quit running before mile four, I missed out on the naturally released endorphins that produce such an incredible feeling of “rightness.”  It’s the only way I can think to describe it.  It’s called the runner’s high because of the sense of intense wellbeing that envelops one after a good run.

There is a “writeness” that exists for authors, too.  If we write our way into that place where our mind, heart, and life energies merge, it is possible to experience the writer’s high.  Sometimes we get there without expending a whole lot of energy.  It can feel effortless at times.  There are those days, though, when we may not hit our flow until mile five, or seven, or ten.  The thing is to keep writing.  There is always that breakthrough mile where it begins to feel incredibly right.

Whether you are a new writer or a pro, I encourage you to become an Energy Star.  Writing every day makes us lean, powerful writing machines.  Just as I became a better, stronger runner when I started training with a partner, I encourage you to draw strength from the many talented Squidoo writers.  Have you joined our team?  We’d love to write alongside you and cheer you on toward your next writing milestone.  See you at the starting line.

11 comments:

  1. That is a rather awesome comparison! I do have slow start days as well as up and ready to write days. I love the analogy, and the instruction to build a lean, powerful writing machine through training and endurance. It really is easier when you have a "running" partner too!

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    1. Writing with a team, such as we do here and elsewhere, makes all the difference in the world. Crossing each finish line is all the sweeter when friends are gathered around to help celebrate the victory.

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    2. Indeed! I agree with you completely!!!

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  2. Oh, you have me missing my road race running days shared with my son! Back then I had energy to spare. Today, I find new energy from members of the Review This! blogging team as together we pave our way within the Squidoo community of talented writers and artists. Yes, I have found rightness on this journey as I apply the lessons I learned then and now - sure-footedness and endurance are much more important than speed and there will always be someone here to catch me should I fall or stumble upon the writer's block wall.

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    1. I miss my road race days, too, Ruthi. For one thing, I was skinny back then! Would have loved running a race with you. Oh, wait, we _are_ running together these days. :-) You are such a wonderful writing partner.

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  3. I am going to use this example to try to explain my writing versus my husband's running. I absolutely love it! He may actually, really "get it" now. I love the comparison. It is spot on. I love the rush, the feeling of accomplishment I get from completing a self-imposed goal in my writing. We all get writer's block at some point, but as you pointed out, writing everyday -- training, if you will -- makes those instances fewer and farther between. Excellent article Diana!

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    1. It is a rush, isn't it? The nice thing is that your husband can have his runner's high while you bask in the glow of your writing endorphins. Always a win-win proposition. At least we won't have runner's knees. :-)

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  4. What an encouraging post! I'm very proud to say that I can relate (to the writing part, not the running part). I'll remember this message next time the writing gears just don't want to sync up with my breathing. And oh, that does happen. Thanks RW2010!

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    1. Well you make it look effortless, Susan.

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  5. Thank you, Renaissance Woman! Writing every day makes us stronger. Writing with a partner gives us endurance. And, writing with partners makes it easier to cross the finish line. Great analogy and awesome motivation.

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    1. Writing daily expands our minds, our spirits, our creative capacity. You are right about how that makes us stronger, which in itself is an awesome motivator.

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