Showing posts with label artwork. Show all posts
Showing posts with label artwork. Show all posts

Sunday, August 18, 2019

How to Display Artwork Without Hanging it on the Wall

A Review of 5 Ways to Display Artwork Without Hanging it on the Wall


When levels, hooks, hammers, and nails frustrate you, or you're not keen on marking up the walls, below are designer approved alternative methods to feature art:

1. An Art Easel

Art easels provide mobility. Place your favorite piece of art on an easel and move from room to room when you need a change. Easels come in numerous styles. Finding one to match your decor should be a cinch.

2. Frame TV

Frame TV transforms into art. Samsung's Frame TV turns into a beautiful piece of art when you're not watching it. This particular Frame TV should be wall-mounted. However, if you're planning to wall mount your TV anyway, an art tv provides two-for-one use. Display spectacular artwork from a list of established or up-and-coming artists. Oh, and one more thing, put a Frame TV on an easel for a display of rotating or static art.

3. Lean Art Against the Wall

There are two ways to consider doing this:

Leaning a larger piece on the floor

The trick to this is placing the art in a room without it appearing as a shortcut or after-thought. A very large piece of art should be positioned so that it's part of the design of the room. Avoid placing it away from the focus of the space. The decor and furniture in the room should tie into the piece.

Leaning and layering pieces on a cabinet, bench, fireplace or other furniture surfaces

Layering is exactly what it sounds like. You layer a variety of photos so they're slightly touching each other. As an example, on a cabinet,  layer multiple family photos in a collection of matching or non-matching frames against the wall.

4. Place Art in a Decorative or Non-Operational Fireplace

An unused fireplace insert area is ideal to display art. Choose at least one or more pieces to cover the entire back wall, then layer a few smaller pieces in front. The art completes the fireplace by giving it a distinctive purpose.

5. Use a Bookcase or Large Cabinet

If you have a large bookcase or cabinet, lean your art inside one or more of the shelves. It's especially lovely to use larger art pieces on a few shelves. Don't stop at one or two pieces, add several in varying sizes.

If You Decide to Hang Photos on the Wall, what are the Best Hooks?

If ultimately you decide to hang your photos, I HIGHLY recommend these hooks. They're the only ones I use. It's one of those 'As you see on TV' products and they're fantastic. They only leave a pinhole in the wall and you don't need tools (hammers etc) to hang your pictures. I can hang photos on my own now, no need to ask for help.





Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article.


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Friday, September 18, 2015

Site Review: Richard Burns Art Website

http://www.reviewthisreviews.com/2015/09/site-review-richard-burns-art-website.html
One of my favorite current day artists is Richard Burns.  Having his artwork available to purchase online is fabulous for those of us who prefer shopping at home.  It gives us time to really look closely and consider our purchases.  Of course, in the case of Richard Burns Art, I don't really need a lot of time.  I already know his style and artwork is exquisite. 

I have visited many museums in my lifetime.  Spent hours viewing and considering the artwork that is displayed.  There are times when I have wondered what the artist was thinking when they were painting a particular piece, and other times when I have thought I knew exactly what was going through their minds.  It is the latter style of art that I prefer.

While I am often intrigued by abstract art, it is the realistic art that speaks to my soul.  When an artists captures the realistic beautiful essence of a natural being or setting, that is real art to me.  When an artist can look at something and paint it on a canvas with such mastery that I completely feel I am there, or that I could reach out and touch a living thing, then I know I am viewing the work of an exceptional artist.



Animals by Richard Burns
Tigers Icy Courtship by Richard Burns


I love animals, so it will come as no surprise to anyone to learn that my favorite Richard Burns collection is his Animal art.

His wildlife art is fabulous!  The detail on the fur or feathers makes me believe I could reach right into the print and touch they magnificent big cats, wolves, coyote and fowl.

I can almost feel the softness of a tiger's skin or the course matting of the wolves thick coat.



Look at the eyes, the head and the tail of the wolf in the forefront of the painting below.  See how his head is lifted, his eyes are almost closed and how is tail is down, almost flush against his body?  That is exactly the way a wolf looks when he howls.  Perhaps, that is why I have always thought the wolf howls from deep within himself, expressing his heartfelt concerns.  Every part of his body "howls" with his voice.  I can almost see this one breathing.

Arctic Echoes by Richard Burns
Arctic Echoes by Richard Burns



Cottages & Houses by Richard Burns


The cottages, houses and lighthouse paintings by Richard Burns are ideal.  While we rarely see such beauty in this world, we can have the image captured forever on canvas.  Their serenity and elegance can grace our own homes constantly and the flowers will always be in full bloom.

Serenity Cottages II by Richard Burns
Serenity Cottages II by Richard Burns



Angels by Richard Burns


I am surrounded by angels.  Not just in the spiritual realm, but also in the artwork I choose to display in my own home.  I always look at the hair color, the facial features as well as the overall design.  Whimsical is fine, but I like the pretty angels.  I love the flowing gowns, the detailed wings and the accents, like the flowers in the picture below, in Richard Burns' Angel collection.

http://richardburnsart.com/
Moon Angel by Richard Burns



Originals and Prints Available


The very best place to view artwork by Richard Burns is on the Richard Burns Art website itself.  Select the image you desire and then move over to Amazon, Zazzle or Art.com to place your order.  His art is available on prints, wall decals and I even discovered a tapestry throw of the angel shown above on Amazon.

But, if you are seeking the very best, to own the original, some of Richard original works are available for purchase.   You can contact them for availability through their website by clicking here and simply leaving a message in the comment section.


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Sunday, June 7, 2015

The Mysterious Death of Tom Thomson - Canadian Artist

Path Behind Mowat Lodge Canvas Print by Tom Thomson
Path Behind Mowat Lodge Canvas Print
Available Via Amazon
The Life, Death and Art of Famous Canadian Artist Tom Thomson

Tom Thomson is one of Canada's most famous Artists who died mysteriously, and whose death is still talked about today.
I can't quite put my finger on why I find the lives of famous artists so intriguing. However, I do think it has something to do with an artist's plight to fulfil their calling while their lives are plastered with difficultly. Added to the fact that, in many cases, their work isn't valued or appreciated until after they die - Upsetting and incredibly unfair.
Tom Thomson was absolutely one of those artists. He only lived to the age of 39 and died under mysterious circumstances. To this day the suspicious speculations of his death are still labelled inconclusive.
Northern Light
Tom Thomson:
Born: August 5, 1877, in Claremont, Ontario, Canada
Died: July 8, 1917 (aged 39), Canoe Lake, Algonquin Park, Ontario, Canada

NORTHERN LIGHT - The enduring mystery of Tom Thomson and the woman who loved him - This is VERY Interesting!

The details of Tom Thomson's life story, Authored by Roy MacGregor in "Northern Light", are very intriguing. He speaks about Thomson's life as well as his untimely death and the mystery surrounding it.
If you appreciate the journey of artists you will enjoy listening to this.


Tom Thomson and The Group of Seven
Tom Thomson, The Early Years

At 22 years old he was an Apprentice at an Iron Foundry and was fired because he was always late. He then attempted to join the armed services that same year, but due to a medical condition was denied entry.

In 1901 he was accepted into Business College in Chatham, Ontario but dropped out after eight months to go to the business college his brother operated in Seattle, Washington. While in Seattle, he had a brief romance with Alice Lambert.

He returned to Canada in 1904 and in 1907 he joined a Toronto design firm named Grip Ltd where many of the future "Group of Seven" also worked.

The Group of Seven

The Group of Seven were a famous group of Canadian Landscape Painters in the 1920's. Tom Thomson was never an official member of the Group of Seven, however he is recognized as having greatly influenced them.
The members of the Group of Seven were, Franklin Carmichael, Lawren Harris, A. Y. Jackson, Franz Johnston, Arthur Lismer, J. E. H. MacDonald, and Frederick Varley.

Heffel's record $2,749,500.00 sale of Tom Thomson ~ Early Spring, Canoe Lake



Tom Thomson's Major Source of Inspiration & Art Career

Tom Thomson was inspired by Ontario's wilderness. His first visit to Algonquin Park was in 1912. That year he began working along side members of the Group of Seven at Rous and Mann Press, but he left later in the year to become his own full time artist.

His first exhibit was with the Ontario Society of Artists in 1913 and he later become a member in 1914. That same year the National Gallery of Canada purchased one of his paintings. His exhibits continued with the Ontario Society of Artists until his mysterious death in 1917.

He eventually moved to Canoe Lake in Algonquin Park. He worked as a fire fighter, ranger, and guide in Algonquin Park, but gave that up as he found it didn't give him enough time to paint. From 1914 to 1917 before he died, is when he created his most famous work; The Jack Pine, The West Wind and The Northern River.

Tom Thomson's Art & Artistic Talent

The Death of Tom Thomson
Tom Thomson was another one of those "mostly self taught" artists. He was very young when he began drawing and painting, but didn't pursue it as a career until he was in his thirties. Of course, his untimely death at the age of 39 would cut short the number of paintings he would become famous for.
He did produce hundreds of sketches between 1912 and 1917 (the year he died). Today these sketches are considered part of his portfolio of works and are featured in the Art Gallery of Ontario, and the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa.
He transformed from Graphic Designer to Professional Painter, with the help of Dr. James MacCallum between 1914 and 1917.
Many of his famous paintings began as sketches and later evolved into large oil paintings at his "Studio". His studio was an old shack, with a wood stove on the grounds of Studio Building.
With his use of broad brush strokes and his liberal use of paint to capture color, his art resembles post-impressionists, Vincent Van Gogh & Paul Cezanne.
Thomson was provided the same level of respect and prominence as Renoir, Picasso and The Group of Seven in 2002 when the National Gallery of Canada staged a major exhibition of his art.

The Mysterious Death of Tom Thomson

On July 8th, 1917 at the age of 39, Tom Thomson disappeared on a canoeing trip on Canoe Lake in Algonquin Park. His body wasn't discovered until eight days later. Although there were reports that he had his fishing line wrapped around his feet seventeen times, and signs of a head injury, the official cause of death was deemed accidental.
The speculation on the cause of his death continues today. Numerous scenarios have been put forth, including murder and suicide. 



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