Showing posts with label Creativity for Kids. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Creativity for Kids. Show all posts

Sunday, November 24, 2019

How to Write a Riddle? Six Basic Tips

A Review of 6 Tips on How You Can Write Your Own Riddles

Have you ever written a riddle? It's a crazy knack I happen to have. Today I'll share some of the riddles I've created with a few tips on how you can write your own.

Why Riddles?

Along with sayings for greeting cards, I've been writing riddles for most of my life. The ability to toss out one-liners seems to be a genetic anomaly in my family. My dad could make people laugh on a dime; he was hilarious! That chip landed on my brother, and he too can toss out funny lines anywhere, any time.

It seems the verbal skills possessed by my dad and brother transferred to me in writing form.

So why riddles? Here's why: This world is too serious right now, so to break-up the constant barrage of negative coming at us, I decided to create books about riddles, quotes, and sayings. But in this article, I'll be sharing some tips on how to write a riddle.

An Example of One of My Personally Written Riddles:

I am a word that has three letters,
but I'm actually six letters long,
I'm used when thinking or trying to figure
what may have gone wrong,
here is a clue that may help you,
four of my letters are the same,
and the first three letters spell a body part, 
or an animal's name,
What word am I?

(Take a guess in the comment section - try not to peek at other comments in case they've guessed the answer correctly!)

How to Write a Riddle

1. Choose the Answer First

Start with the answer. Pick the word you want to write the riddle about, then go from there.

2. Choose a Word that Has Multiple Meanings or can be Expressed Multiple Ways

It's easier to write a riddle about a word that has more than one meaning (spelled the same, or spelled differently). For example, Aunt/Ant, Fly, Park, Plant. These types of words give you the ability to create the riddle from various angles.

Here's an example of one of my riddles with an answer that has multiple meanings:

It's said we all have one
those who believe never doubt,
that everyone is included,
no one is left out,
we also say it to mean
"there's only one,"
and when it's spelled differently
we use it to run,
wait, don't be confused because
I'll give you some pity,
when spoken out loud
it's the name of a city,
What word am I?

3. It Doesn't Have to Rhyme

Some people can rhyme anything, and others, not so much. Your riddle will work either way. If you're not great at rhyming, think about writing the riddle with a rhythm.

Here's an example of another of my riddles using rhythm:

You write them
you get them
you give them
you hate them
you love them
you dread them
you need them
but you probably
never ever want them
What am I?

4. It's Easier to Write Riddles About Things You Can't Physically See

Try writing a riddle using a word that represents the unseen such as, thoughts, ideas, gravity, love, grace, nasty, and so on. Think 'invisible' - You get the picture.

5. Think About What People Can Relate to with the Word/Answer

When you're writing your riddle, think about how people relate to the word. As an example, the riddle in point number three above is obscure and can technically have more than one answer (although there is a specific answer to it).

In riddle two, the meanings are different, the answer is spelled multiple ways, and the clues are more specific. As an example the specific clues are; everyone has one, it means just one, you use it to run, it's the name of a city.

6. Test Your Riddles Out on Your Friends and Family

See how difficult it is for your people to answer; if they never solve any of them, they're probably too complicated. Mix it up, create both easier riddles and more challenging riddles. For Thanksgiving, my family used my riddles for a fun after-dinner game. The game was to see who could solve them the fastest. It was quite comical to hear them yelling over each other.

If the above riddles are frustrating you, there's more where that came from here, and you'll be guided to the riddle answers from that page as well.

Your Assignment:

Write a riddle that has the answer, "Park" - have fun!

By the way, in my book (A Party Game #STUMPED), you'll find my riddle for the word "Park" on page 70 (it's riddle 56).


Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article. “As an Amazon Associate I (we) earn from qualifying purchases.”


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Sunday, September 9, 2018

3 Items to Help Get the Kids Moving Faster in the Morning

Review of Specific Products to Help Speed Up the Kids in the Morning

There are numerous blogging tips on things you can do to speed up the little ones.

However, rather than rehash the standard suggestions, below are physical items you can include in your day.

1. Getting The Kids Out of Bed with Clocky

Those little sleepy heads can be a handful to wake-up. Take your troubles, and hand them over to a fun alarm clock. Clocky turns waking up in the morning into an annoyingly laughable event.

The kids get one chance to hit snooze, then Clocky jumps off the dresser making fun noises while it rolls around the bedroom. With Clocky, the days of multiple snooze button taps are over.

The kids have to get out of bed to shut it off.

2. Make the Beds with Zip-Up Bedding

Professional bed making doesn't come close to making the list when you and the kids have to be out the door by a certain time. However, there is a way to get them to make their beds without taking forever.

Try Zip-Up Bedding. It will speed up the bed making process while teaching the kids responsibility. Zip-Up bedding is exactly what it says; it zips up. There are no sheets to tuck in and no blankets to pull wrinkles out of.

The kids just get-up and zip-up.

3. Set a Deadline Using a Calendar with Reward/Completion Stickers

Stickers alone won't do it. Having the kids put a completion sticker on a calendar isn't enough incentive: You need to give them a deadline. In other words, the sticker needs to be placed on the calendar by "x time" in the morning.

Only when the tasks are completed, can they put their sticker on the calendar.

Here are some items for the kids 'getting-ready' list (Things to do before putting that sticker on the calendar):
  • Got out of bed
  • Got dressed and cleaned
  • Made the bed
  • School bag packed (if applicable)
Depending on your child's age, you can add more or less to the list.
Chore Chart for Kids - Magnetic Reward Calendar Board - Dry Erase Schedule Responsibility Charts - Toddler Behavior - Wall Sticker Rewards Magnets - Multiple Toddlers Family - Potty Training PlannerChore Chart for Kids - Magnetic Reward Calendar Board - Dry Erase Schedule Responsibility Charts - Toddler Behavior - Wall Sticker Rewards Magnets - Multiple Toddlers Family - Potty Training Planner
By giving the kids a time that the completion stickers are to be placed on the calendar, you're teaching them about deadlines.

If they don't get downstairs in time to put the sticker on the calendar as per your schedule, then stand firm and don't permit them to place their sticker for that day.

The calendar becomes a way of tallying how they're meeting the morning deadlines.

Don't make it a competition between siblings. The goal is for each child to improve their own habits, not to make them feel bad if their sibling is faster than they are. 

At the end of the month count up the stickers and give them a prize for their effort. That prize could be whatever works for your family; a trip to the park, a movie, an evening out to eat, pizza ordered in and so on. You decide.

Here's to your family getting out the door on time!



Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article. “As an Amazon Associate I (we) earn from qualifying purchases.”


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Saturday, February 17, 2018

Reviewing Hide & Seek Rock Painting Kit by Creativity for Kids

Hide & Seek Rock Painting Kit
While working part time in a retail shop over the holidays,  I checked out a 'grandmother' and her purchase. The minute I saw what she was buying for a grandchild ~ this Rock Painting Kit ~ I knew immediately that it was the perfect Christmas gift for MY grandson as well.  Naturally, by the end of my work day, I had purchased my own kit to send to my artistically inclined 8-year-old grandson David. 

David loves to draw, color and paint, and is a very creative child, so it is not surprising that 'Creativity for Kids' has a variety of creative kits that appeal to kids like him. 




Creativity for Kids Company


Creativity for Kids is a division of the Faber-Castell company, established in 1761 by the cabinet maker Kaspar Faber and  is one of the oldest industrial companies in the world.  

The company is the world’s leading manufacturer of wood-cased pencils with a varied range of products for writing, drawing and creative design.

Faber-Castell acquired Creativity for Kids, the leading U.S. specialty manufacturer of creative activity products for children of all ages, in 1999 and is now headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio.  The next year (2000) the company introduced Children’s Art Products, which are a line of playing and learning art supplies for children.  

The creative kits include a wide variety of artistic play from painting, jewelry making, garden crafts, lighting crafts, science-related invention kits, and a host of other kits in many fields.

You can see the whole range of kits at their website.


Hide & Seek Rock Painting Kit





The kit I chose for my grandson, David, age 8,  was the Hide & Seek Rock Painting Kit.  



Image from Amazon of kit contents
The kit comes with 10 River Rocks, 8 paint colors, 2 paint brushes, 20 transfer designs, tracking stickers, a transfer sponge and instructions.  

This rock painting kit is called 'Hide & Seek' because you can hide the rocks outside and leave clues on the company's Facebook page for people to go and find your rocks. The online link is printed on the package.

I thought this would be a fun project for David & Tyler who love to spend time outside in parks in their area. And when they finish painting all the rocks that came in the kit, they can find more rocks in parks and woods to continue using the kit.


David & Tyler with their painted rocks (c) Elf
The age group for this craft activity kit states it is for children 6 years and up, but David's little 3-1/2 year old brother enjoyed 'painting' the rocks too and both  enjoyed the projects (as you can see in the photo).

The company's motto states:

“Rock Painting is a fun way for you, your friends and family to spread kindness, encouragement and happiness throughout your community – one rock at a time."

Creativity for Kids helps develop children's problem solving and critical thinking skills. I found this rock painting kit to be a fun and delightful educational toy for my young grandsons.


My Grandsons' Collection of Painted Rocks!






More Toy Reviews can be found at: 



(c) Wednesday Elf 2/17/2018






Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article. “As an Amazon Associate I (we) earn from qualifying purchases.”


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