Showing posts with label Frontline flea drops. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Frontline flea drops. Show all posts

Friday, April 2, 2021

Frontline Flea & Tick Drops for Dogs and Cats Reviewed


Each spring I am reminded that there are a few things I really hate about the arrival of warmer weather.  The main one is ticks.  I absolutely abhor ticks! 

I have always lived in the beautiful state of Tennessee.  There is so much to love here.  We have the benefit of experiencing all four seasons, we can grow beautiful flowers, trees and plants, plus we have a wide range of terrain that includes hills, mountains, woods and farm land.  Unfortunately, ticks love our state too. 

We enjoy walking in the woods, on trails, and exploring the world around us.  We always take our dog with us and ticks love our dog as much as they love our state.  Those mean critters hop on him with evil intentions, but he has a Frontline of defense that leaves them wishing they had chosen a different host.

I remember well the first time we armed our first dog with Frontline. After a day of frolicking in the woods with our daughter, he laid down on the entry tile to sleep.  When he awoke, a pile of dead ticks were surrounding him.  Ah, the perfect tick!  

Since that day, all of our dogs have been protected by Frontline Plus, which also kills fleas.


How & When to Treat a Dog with Frontline Flea & Tick Drops

 FRONTLINE Plus Flea and Tick Treatment for Dogs (Extra Large Dog, 89-132 Pounds, 6 Doses)Check Price When to treat you pets may vary by location. I suspect some lower southern states need to treat their pets year round.  In Tennessee, we grab the Frontline as soon as the first warm day arrives.  That is usually in late February or early March.  Since ticks go dormant during the winter (days with temperatures of under 32°), our dogs get a break from the medicine between October and March.  After that, the drops are applied once a month to keep them protected. 

The word "drops" implies that there isn't much liquid applied, but that really isn't an accurate description.  The vials contain the amount of medicine required based on the pets weight.  For our Labrador retriever, his vials contain about a teaspoon of medicine. 

The vial applicators are plastic and are vial shaped with a neck so you are able to apply the liquid all on one spot of skin between a dogs shoulder blades.  You must separate his fur and apply the medicine to his skin (it is absorbed through the skin).

Once dry, the Frontline is waterproof and will continue to protect your swimming pups.

A few words of caution:

  • Wear disposable gloves when treating your pet with Frontline
  • Do not touch the liquid yourself.  I found this out the hard way. I get a severe sore throat if I accidentally touch the spot, even if I wash my hands quickly.
  • Avoid petting the animal in the application area until it is completely dry (experience tells me that is about a day)
  • We apply it at bedtime which allows 8hrs before we are likely to accidentally touch the application spot
  • Do Not apply Frontline to young puppies less than 8 weeks old according to the package, but I recommend consulting your vet for the appropriate age recommendation. We have never used it on a puppy less than a year old.  
  • Don't let other animals lick the treated spot
  • Do Not apply more often than once a month

Now, you may wonder, with all of these cautions, is it really worth it. Easy answer, yes!  Ticks carry diseases that could not only kill your pet, but would also kill you should the tick or its offspring prefer you to the dog. 

I've read the numbers of people who die annually from tick transmitted diseases.  They seem low when reading, especially if you weigh that number against how many people hike regularly. However, I have personally known someone who died of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and it no longer seems as rare as one might think if you just read the statistics.

Having grown up in the south, I know ticks are common. Dogs and cats can't check themselves for ticks. Unless a human just happens to pet them when the tick is embedded and recognize the nasty "lump", a tick can live on a dog for weeks, months or even years based on the tick species and gender. One of the last things a pet owner wants is a tick infestation. 

As with any medication, check with your pet's doctor before using Frontline.  If the vet doesn't mention tick prevention to you, you now know to ask them.






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