Showing posts with label Gardening. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Gardening. Show all posts

Tuesday, January 9, 2024

Reviewing the Stunning Snowdrop In Gardens And Home Decor.

 

snowdrops flowers

I adore Snowdrops. From the end of December I start eagerly searching for signs of snowdrop life. To see those tiny green shoots really lifts my heart and brings such joy. To me Snowdrops epitomise beauty, strength and overcoming adversity.

They are the first flowers to bloom in the year and  are a symbol of hope and renewal after the long wet, cold winter.

 Snowdrops appear so fragile and delicate yet they are so resilient. The exquisite white flowers are a beautiful sight I look forward to every year.


snowdrops


Snowdrops are a Spring flower and part of the amaryllis family. They are classed as a hardy perennial mostly flowering in January and February. They are small and close to the ground growing about 3 to 6 inches tall yet are perfectly capable of growing up through snow and ice.

 

There are many varieties of snowdrop each with their slightly different height and shape and size of flower. I enjoy making home decor items and greetings cards from photographs I take of snowdrops in my garden and the parks nearby each year. 


 Snowdrops are very easy to grow. They enjoy partial shade and moist soil. If they are happy they will grow into stunning drifts of white flowers and look amazing. Equally they look gorgeous in small or large pots.

Mostly I grow snowdrops as an outdoor plant but I have heard of people growing them indoors to use as table decoration and an alternative or addition to buying cut flowers in winter which sounds a great idea I may try. 

Snowdrops are so delicate looking and beautiful that they make great subjects for home decor and you can buy many snowdrop related items. For example from cushions to hand painted glass or this lovely Glass Flower Snowdrop Glass handblown  or snowdrop scented candles. 

 

Snowdrops are a  fleeting flower but by having them in home decor items you can have snowdrops all year round. 

Being with white flowers and green stems they fit in with most home decor schemes and always look fresh, clean and appealing. 



Snowdrops always leave me feeling joy and smiling perhaps more than any other flower. Perhaps it is their tenacity and resilience wrapped in such delicate beauty having come through winter with all its challenges ready to charm us all and bring happiness.

I would never be without them in my garden and  in pots and in my home in one way or another. 






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Diary Of A Wild Country Garden







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Tuesday, December 26, 2023

A Review Of The Holly Tree A Symbol Of Winter and Festivity

 Holly Hedge In Garden with red berries


I hope you all had a wonderful, Peaceful Christmas.

Now feels like the time for me to start the gardening year. At first the feeling is slow, almost imperceptible, but its there and each day the days are getting just that little bit longer and the prospect of getting out there more appealing. 

The shortest day in terms of daylight hours where I live is over and despite the cold weather and seemingly bleak outlook, if you listen and look carefully you can feel nature starting to wake up.

Now is the day if I am home, that I venture out into the garden. During most of December I rarely go into the garden, we have heavy, wet clay soil and when rainy it only gets muddy and then compacted if I tread on it. In freezing weather it really is hard like a stone. I can do a lot more harm than good gardening at this time in our garden.  So generally for most of December the garden and I have a break from each other. 

However today I look and listen and I can feel my soul wanting to reconnect with the garden. There is often not too much to look at now and all the winter jobs are done. However, as I gaze around I look for tiny signs of growth and appreciate the bones of the garden. The evergreens that are always there, are so reliable, so constant and without the distraction of colour and flowers, they come into their own right now. 

Holly red berries

Holly Types And Growing Needs

The best at this time of year is the Holly. Although Holly can be deciduous, we grow only the evergreen type. The Holly tree is a symbol of winter and festivity and many of us cut and bring in Holly branches to decorate our homes in winter. 

The holly tree, common Holly, or to give it is rather pretty Latin name Ilex aquifolium, is an  evergreen shrub or tree that can potentially grow up to around 15 meters plus or about 50 feet tall though you can prune to keep it more manageable.

There are also many smaller varieties reaching up to half that size such as Ilex aquifolium 'Silver Mermaid' 6m x 4m (approx 20 x 13 feet) or even smaller sizes suitable for a pot like Ilex aquifolium 'Hascombensis' 2.5m x 1.5m (approx 8 x 5 feet). These are more suitable for a small garden or if you simply want a smaller tree with less maintenance. Some even have lovely variagated leaves such as Ilex x altaclerensis 'Golden King' 6m x 3m (approx 20 x 10 feet), which is a female variety and does produce red berries.

Holly Berries can be colours mostly from red to yellow and orange on different varieties. A Holly Plant is generally either male or female so to get those beautiful berries you will need a female tree with  male tree nearby. However some of the male varieties even though there are no berries, have really gorgeous leaves and habits and are worth growing.

Holly is grown in gardens both domestic and stately, woodland and hedgerows mainly. It can be a specimum plant glorious on its own or grown as part of a pretty inpenetrable spiky hedge which is excellent for security. We grow it alone and as part of our mixed hedge. It is also found in the wild where the common Holly can grow very tall and wide indeed if unchecked. 

Male holly hedge growing through iron fence


Holly is beautiful with often very dark green, glossy, and usually very spiky sometimes variagated leaves. It can have small white flowers in Spring, though most will not be grown for the flowers. The main feature of the female Holly is the beautiful berries that really brighten up the day and look spectacular against the dark green leaves.  

It prefers to grow in a sunny or semi shade position on moist but well drained soil. It is not fussy about soil being happy in loam, chalk, sand or clay and acid, neutral or alkaline soil type. It can cope well in an exposed site or a sheltered position and is content to face any way except north. 

I have only space to mention a few varieties of Holly here. If you want Holly in your own garden there are so many varieties offering different sizes and features it is best to research what is suitable for your garden and needs. 


Uses Of The Holly Tree

The Holly tree is a very valuable tree for its many uses.

As the wood is hard, heavy, and fine-grained, it is good for making furniture, carving, and inlay work. Leaves and berries are wonderful for crafting projects whether it is using real Holly or artificial Holly.

It can be used for Christmas or New year decorations including wreaths, and table centre pieces or a winter display to brighten up a dull corner.

At a time when flowers are rare in the garden and expensive to buy, a display of Holly in a vase is a beautiful alternative through out winter. 

Holly For Nature 

For nature Holly is an extremely valuable tree. The spiky leaves provide safe shelter all year round and nesting sites.

The Winter time berries are food for birds and small mammals and the  flowers in Spring attract bees and pollinators. 

Even its roots help to stabilise the soil and prevent erosion.

 

Wild yellow berry Holly

Holly In Mythology and Symbolism

The Holly tree has a rich history of mythology and symbolism.

For many of us Holly is a part of the Holiday festivities bringing in boughs of Holly real or artificial for home decor and is a  symbol of joy. When we bring in Holly into our homes it is also supposed to protect from evil spirits and lightning, and to bring prosperity and good luck! 

Holly has associations with the sun god and the winter solstice, and was considered a sacred plant by the Druids, Romans, and Celts. It was believed to have magical powers, such as healing, protection, and fertility. It was also a symbol of peace, joy and goodwill, and was used to make crowns and gifts. 

 The Holly was adopted by Christianity, as a symbol of Christ's birth, death, and resurrection with the crown of thorns representing blood and eternal life. 

We even have songs about Holly such as "The Holly And The Ivy", perfectly performed here by Kings College, Cambridge UK.



So the holly tree is a stunning plant in nature and in our gardens that has history, mythology and many benefits for us and wildlife. 

 To step outside into the garden on a crisp cold day in the midst of winter or wrap up and enjoy a winter walk and see a glorious Holly tree covered in gorgeous berries is a highlight of the season and one I always look forward to.

 

 Here are some Holly related items you may enjoy.


 







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Tuesday, November 28, 2023

Reviewing Our Experience Of The Treetop Walkway Kew Gardens London

View of green leafy tree canopy at Treetop Walkway Kew gardens

The Treetop Walkway is an exciting part of Kew Gardens London. Stepping up to the walkway in the tree canopy and looking out over the vista of the gorgeous Kew gardens was one of the highlights of our trip.

The many steps to reach the top was absolutely worth it and we took our time and enjoyed the views on the walk up to the top. 


View across the trees at Treetop Walkway at Kew Gardens


I have wanted to visit and experience Kew Gardens Treetop Walkway for years and when I got the chance I was so happy. I was especially excited to find out what it felt like walking high up amongst and above the tree canopy and it was amazing!

The walkway itself is essentially a walk at height on a wide safe pathway through the treetops of Kew Gardens. It is an amazing piece of architecture built with more than four hundred tonnes of weathered steel, which although quite industrial looking, has its own beauty and surprisingly does become absorbed and integrated by the trees all around.

View across to the walkway at Kew Gardens

The structure needs to be strong though as there are 118 steps up to the main walkway in the sky, then you walk up onto the pathway which is 18 metres or 59 feet above the ground! 

The walkway itself is 200 metres or 656 feet long and that means you really do get a great experience literally walking in amongst the amazing trees and seeing them with a totally new rarely experienced perspective.


Trees and branches with leaves at Kew Gardens Treetop Walkway


As a child I was always climbing trees and loved being high up in the midst of a tree among the leaves and berries and closer to the birds. However there is no way I could have safely climbed this high and now I would not even attempt it! So enjoying the amazing tree canopy in a safe way like this is just perfect.

Horse chestnut trees with seeds
 

I love looking up at trees from the ground level and being in awe of their beauty and majesty. It was amazing to be walking amongst the uppermost branches of the trees really close to the birds taking a rest in the branches, the fruits of trees, seeing the insects that live there and noticing he fungi and lichen at that level. It felt a real privilege and joy to be there. 


View between trees to the Glasshouses At Kew gardens


It is however important to note a few safety aspects of the walkway. By its very nature being so high up you need to be Ok with walking around at that height. 

The walkway is quite wide and has semi circular places where you can stop and look out over the views and let others pass as necessary. In some areas there are benches to sit.

To me it all felt very safe and secure. The walkway is designed to flex a bit and we certainly did feel that from time to time which initially was a bit strange, but we got used to it. We found it not bouncy and not at all like the swinging of a ropewalk, but rather feeling sturdy with some movement. The flex in the walkway is an important design feature so that it can cope with the winds without breaking.

The weathered steel walkway at Kew gardens Treetop walk

You do have to leave buggies and pushchairs on the ground and young children must be closely supervised. The rails are high but I would not like to take chances with very young children, so best to keep hold of them.  

 As there are 118 steps up and many steps down, you do need to be fit enough to walk them. You can certainly take your time, which we did and look out over the wonderful views on the way up, but if you have any issues with climbing steps it would be better to use the lift provided. It may be best to check ahead of your visit if you need the lift or assistance to ensure it is available and suitable for you. 

View looking down on the lift at Kew Gardens Treetop walk
 

Also personally we did avoid the large school parties which were there. It was wonderful to see the children so engaged and excited, but we wanted to go at a calmer time so that we could go at a steady pace on the way up without feeling rushed or obligated to go faster, and could drink in the atmosphere in a more peaceful way.  

View over the green tree canopy

It is best to check before visiting when the walkway is open both in dates and times. Clearly safety is always considered first so weather conditions need to be taken into account. Have to say although I am good with heights I was glad it was a still and warm day. I am not sure if I would have enjoyed it as much had it been windy and cold.

Spring, Summer and early Autumn are all wonderful times to visit and will give very different experiences of the tree canopy.  It does often close or partially close during the Autumn and winter months.

I thoroughly enjoyed the treetops experience and am glad that we took the time out to experience it. We spent probably about two hours exploring and absorbing the treetops. We saw some people wizz around in less than an hour and we could have probably stayed longer but had so much more of Kew Gardens to explore! It is both an educational and enjoyable experience.


Take a look at these wonderful books about or related to Kew Gardens 

The Story of Kew Gardens in Photographs


The Kew Gardens Beautiful Flowers Colouring Book Paperback



Kew: The Witch's Forest: Trees in magic, folklore and traditional remedies (Kew Royal Botanic Gardens) Hardcover – September 19, 2023


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Tuesday, November 14, 2023

Reviewing Our Visit To The Waterlily House Kew Gardens London.

 

Giant Waterlilies At Kew gardens Waterlily House

From the second I stepped into the Waterlily House at Kew Gardens in London I was filled with awe and wonder. I was both excited and calmed by the environment. It is amazing and I truly love being here. 

Kew gardens is based in Kew near Richmond in south London. The Waterlily House is one of the smaller glasshouses at Kew, finished in 1852 and now a listed building.

This glasshouse was designed specifically to showcase the amazing giant Amazon waterlily, (Victoria amazonica) which is a natural wonder and deservedly so. 



Kew Gardens Waterlily House Entrance


Experiencing The Waterlily House 

Do not be fooled by the Waterlily House unassuming entrance. It belies the beautiful experience you are about to have.  As you enter you are immediately greeted with a vibrant array of tropical and aquatic plants including waterlilies and climbers and everything in between, each one a thing of beauty, interest and sheer joy.

When you enter the Water Lily house you are straight away  struck by the beauty, then the humidity. In fact it is the hottest and most humid of the glasshouses and it feels like it. You are transported into a different world. 

Measuring only 225 square metres or 738 square feet, the small glasshouse heats up very quickly and especially when the weather outside is warm and sunny, so if you visit be prepared for that. Layers you can take on and off quickly as you go in and out of the glasshouses are your friend at Kew Gardens. 

Giant Waterlilies, Kew Gardens Waterlily House


The atmosphere inside emotionally is a mixture of silent awe and excited chatter. When we were there a group of schoolchildren were happily taking photographs and calling to each other to look here and there at the plants. It was heart warming to see them so interested and enthralled. 

Couples were wandering through smiling at the plants and each other. Others were intent on reading the descriptions of the plants and looking up more details on their phones. Some stood silently gazing. From time to time complete strangers would meet, both looking at a plant and strike up a natural friendly conversation.

For our time in there everyone had one focus and one joy and it was wonderful.

Close up Of Giant Waterlily


The Pond and Giant Waterlily 

At his heart is the circular pond where the giant waterlilies live. This spans over 10 metres or about 32 feet and takes up a large central area of the house. There is a perimeter circular pathway all around and more plants around the perimeter and hanging above our heads. As you walk around you brush against the plants and are able to touch and smell them. The pathway is not large so there is a lot of "excuse me" and smiling as we move past each other. We are all surrounded by gorgeous, interesting plants and immersed in nature.  

 Some of the waterlilies are almost purely circular while others to me seemed to have a heart shape, all are stunning. We found the giant Waterlily Victoria boliviana in the pond, it is very easy to spot! This is a record breaking waterlily, named as a new species by Kew Gardens in 2022. The lily pads of this species grow up to three metres or about ten feet wide so they are huge and very impressive indeed. They have very wide rims upturned and prickly undersides. 

They have beautiful large fragrant flowers which open white and mature to a pretty pink. Gorgeous as they are, each flower only lasts for 2 days. It is truly an amazing sight to behold. We are not permitted to touch these waterlilies but to see them is a privilege.

Giant waterlilies were discovered in Bolivia in 1801 and later on named "Victoria" to honour Queen Victoria Of The United Kingdom. They understandably attracted a lot of attention and curiosity. The huge lily pads look spectacular and grow so massive they are able to carry an adult. However this is most certainly not permitted at Kew and is an offence as can harm the plant and would eventually ruin this most beautiful display of waterlilies. These days only Kew Garden staff are allowed into the pond. 

It is also interesting that In the mid-19th century, a specimen of the waterlily was sent to Joseph Paxton, the architect. He designed Crystal Palace in south London which housed the Great Exhibition of 1851. It is said that the waterlily leaf inspired his design for that amazing building. Sadly fire destroyed Crystal Palace 30th November 1936. 

Waterlily Pond, Kew Gardens, London


Plants In The Waterlily House

While everyone is naturally focussed on the amazing giant waterlilies do take time to look around at the other plants.

While the Waterlilies are the stars here, every star needs a good supporting cast and these plants do that very well. In fact many of these beauties made my heart skip a beat as much as the waterlilies.  

There are many beautiful and fascinating plants around the perimeter that are certainly worth taking a while to view and photograph. They add to the beautiful ambiance and magical quality of this lovely place. If I could visit every week I really would! The Waterlily House is open during the Spring, Summer and Autumn up to November then closed for the winter.  


Orange Flower At Waterlily House, Kew


Large Carnivorous Plant At Waterlily House Kew Gardens


People often ask how long will a visit take and I find that difficult to answer. Certainly as one of the smaller glasshouses you can take it all in quite quickly. In ten minutes you can walk all around at a slow pace. However if you do that you are missing the best part of the experience which is to immerse yourself in the plants, see the giant waterlilies and then as you are there longer start to notice all the other details you initially missed. 

We were there around an hour and really I still felt I could have stayed longer. So my suggestion is to take your time, wander round, take photos, read the information if you want but do take time to stop and stare, drink in the atmosphere and fully experience it. If you like gardens you may enjoy the book Royal Gardens Of The World which explores twenty one celebrated, beautiful, interesting gardens.

Pink Flowering Climber Kew gardens Waterlily House


Red Tassels of plant in Waterlily House , Kew



If you love the look of Kew gardens you may like this lovely book  The Story Of Kew Gardens In Photographs. 


So if you ever visit London's Kew gardens do not miss the Waterlily House, it is a real treat and somewhere we go every time we are able to visit Kew Gardens. For me it is a gardening jewel.  


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Tuesday, October 3, 2023

Reviewing Growing Bamboo In Our Garden

Bamboo In Our Garden

A Guide to Bamboo Varieties, Soil Conditions and Care.


Bamboo is such a beautiful and versatile plant. It adds a certain grace and elegance to the garden.  As it is generally a tall, green and elegant plant it gives a garden an added dimension and is also very useful.  Bamboo is an excellent screening plant for any ugly structure and gives privacy and shade in the garden. 

I love the shape of its plentiful leaves and the smooth canes which depending on variety may be of a gorgeous colour. I love the wonderful sound as the wind blows through its foliage.

There are so many types available some suitable for most gardens, some very exotic.  

However with Bamboo, maybe more than many other plants it is important to understand the different varieties and the care they require in order for it to be an asset to your garden and not a difficulty. 


Varieties of Bamboo

Bamboo comes in various varieties, but they can broadly be classified into two types: clumping Bamboo and running Bamboo and it is vital to know which one you are buying or have inherited in your garden.

Clumping Bamboo

As the name suggests, clumping Bamboo grows in tight, compact clumps. This makes it easy to control and contain. This type of Bamboo is ideal for small gardens or areas where you want to prevent it from spreading too aggressively. Some popular clumping Bamboo varieties include Bambusa multiplex, Fargesia spathacea, and Chusquea culeou. We have a clumping bamboo with beautiful black stems and fresh green leaves with an arching habit and is very well behaved. 

Running Bamboo

Running Bamboo tends to spread rapidly through underground rhizomes. The clue is in the name and that it is not easily contained. If not properly managed, it can become very invasive indeed and start popping up all over your lawn and borders and even into neighbours gardens. 

Running Bamboo is really much better suited to larger landscapes or areas where its growth can be restricted. It is possible to grow it in a large container where its growth is restricted but I would even play safe and ensure the pot is placed raised on an area of hard standing so that the roots cannot get through to ground easily. Popular running Bamboo varieties include Phyllostachys aurea, Phyllostachys nigra, and Phyllostachys bambusoides.


Bamboo Plant

Care Of Bamboo

Soil Conditions
Every successful plant story starts with the soil conditions being right for the plant. Bamboo is pretty adaptable and can live in a wide range of soil conditions happily and successfully. However it likes most a well-drained, slightly acidic soil. It is important to note that it really dislikes waterlogged poorly drained soils. We have heavy clay soil but ours lives at the top of a slope which means that it is well drained. So before purchasing a Bamboo it is wise to check your soil structure and type to see if Bamboo will be happy there. 

Watering.
Most Bamboos like moist but not waterlogged soil. We found that our Bamboo required regular watering when establishing as a young plant. As with many plants it is better to give a deep watering once a week than a light watering more often. Once established we find there is no need to water as regularly. It is simply a case of watching the weather and watering often and deeply only in dry spells.

Feeding.
 Bamboo thrives best with a regular feed in the growing season. This is especially true if we are growing it in a large container or have poor soil. If we are gardening on rich soil you may well need to do a lot less feeding. Our soil is rich and so we now do not need to feed very often.  A balanced, slow-release fertiliser when the bamboo is growing will help to promote healthy growth.


Position Of Bamboo

The position Bamboo will thrive in depends on the variety you buy so it is always best to check the details for each plant. Some Bamboo species prefer full sun, others can cope with partial shade. We planted our Bamboo in a sunny south facing position and it is very happy there. 

It is vital to research how much space each particular type of Bamboo you are interested in requires. Clumping Bamboo is generally well behaved and can be planted closer to structures or other plants. Ours is near a fence and other plants and does not cause any issues at all.

However running Bamboo should be given lots of space to spread sited far away from your house and other buildings and your neighbours. Give a running Bamboo even more space than you think it needs and do make a barrier to inhibit its spread. Alternatively grow it in a large, very sturdy container.

Bamboo generally grows tall and does cast gorgeous dappled shade and enchanting shadows on any fences and walls. However that does mean that plants living nearby must enjoy living in dappled shade, or even slightly heavier shade so we must choose the plants around a bamboo carefully for all to be happy.


Bamboo Leaves Against The Sky



Pruning and Maintenance Of Bamboo

Regular pruning of any Bamboo is really essential to remove any dead, damaged and diseased canes. An unpruned bamboo can also very quickly become crowded and look less attractive. With pruning this allows for better air circulation within the plant and inhibits the spread of diseases. 

Pruning a large Bamboo can sometimes feel a little overwhelming so we always start by removing dead or damaged canes at their base. Then we move on to prune individual canes in order to bring light into the plant. I would advise standing back every few cuts to check how the plant looks and how much more you want to prune out.

It is important to prune each cane at ground level. I have seen Bamboo chopped off halfway so it ends up being three or four foot high and it always just looks odd to me to reduce the height of this graceful plant. We prune by thinning out the canes at ground level, which produces a manageable plant with a very graceful habit allowing air and circulation through and a healthier plant. I also like to prune off the lower leaves thereby showing off the really beautiful colour of the canes to full advantage.  

We use our tall prunings as supports for other plants. They are very strong and can be cut to a desired length.  We prune from the ground and then allow them to dry then they are used all over the garden to act as supports for other climbers. We often tie four or five of them together to form a wigwam shape for climbers to grow up.

If you do not have a Bamboo plant you can buy these very useful Bamboo sticks. They are very good for growing tomatoes, beans and peas and supporting young plant growth. 



Containing A Running Bamboo

 If you are planting running Bamboo, it's crucial to install a barrier around its edge to prevent it spreading too far and wide. Use a very tough barrier such as metal at least 18 inches deep to try to control the rhizomes. Even so do keep a watch on it as it can easily escape.

Personally, I would only grow running Bamboo, beautiful as it is, in a large container on a patio, never in my garden. We do not have a large garden and have buildings and neighbours close by so it really is not practical. For us we would always grow a clumping Bamboo for its grace and beauty. 

Bamboo At Kew Gardens.

We were lucky to visit Kew Gardens, London and see some of the Bamboos in the Palm House there. They were truly amazing plants, so tall and with such beautiful canes and leaves. Here are a few photographs I hope you enjoy. 

Bamboo Cane At Kew Gardens.


Close Up Of A Bamboo Cane At Kew Gardens
   

Bamboo is A Beautiful Addition To The Garden


With a little knowledge and care Bamboo can be a beautiful graceful and welcome addition to the garden. I love its gorgeous foliage and the relaxing sounds and how it sways in the wind. 

As most are evergreen you see its beauty all winter and it looks lovely covered in frost or snow as it does when the sunlight shines through it or the raindrops gather.

Bamboo is an excellent screening plant to cover up an ugly fence, the bins or just to give you more privacy in a part of the garden or away from the neighbours. Just make sure you get a suitable variety for your garden and check carefully what type you are buying.  

  

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