Wednesday, May 11, 2016

BlogJob in Transition: A Review

A Review of the BlogJob Blogging Community in a Period of Transition 


When I first joined BlogJob in October of 2015, I was very excited about the community. I believed BlogJob was the writing community that had it all. It not only provided free WordPress hosting and a ready-made audience, but also issued points just for posting blogs. The points could be redeemed for gift cards or deposits of cash into PayPal. What was not to love?

I immediately set up six new blogs. I started to earn points. One could earn the most points for a blog post, because it was important to keep people writing on the site. One could also earn points for interaction with others in forums and groups, for making a new friend, and for commenting and answering on blog posts. Hosting was free, the community was active, and the sky was the limit.

BlogJob in Transition: A Review


Well, not quite. New members who hadn't completed any projects yet could only earn 150 points per day. If one posted three blogs, that used the point limit. No more points for interaction that might normally be earned would be issued. If you had earned your daily limit, your point pot for the day was full. If you had 125 points already and posted a blog post, 25 of your fifty points would just be overflow that would not help you in any way. It would be like pouring water into a full bottle. The rest would run over the sides and be lost. Nevertheless, members just tried to be careful not to earn above their daily limits and most people were quite content.

BlogJob in Transition: A Review
Photo Courtesy of Pixabay
We were disappointed when BlogJob stopped accepting new members shortly after I joined. Referring new members was an important step in completing the first project. Finally the administration removed that requirement and we were OK with that. They said the reason was that referrals weren't being credited properly and they needed time to fix it. I saw that as a tiny red flag. By May, 2016, the door opened to new members again. More of my friends joined.

Then, on April 26, BlogJob members logged in to discover their daily point limit had decreased. Suddenly, I could only earn 100 points a day, not 150. This didn't trouble me too much, since I had enough to do on my own sites that I never reached my limit anyway. Those who depended on BlogJob most for earnings were hurt much more than I. But I began to worry a bit. I had formerly been a happy member of Bubblews, a site that showed similar signs that it might be in financial trouble and later closed, denying payments that members had earned. But they tried to keep members in the dark.

The adminstration of BlogJob has been upfront about what's happening, and membership has closed once more. The site had just been migrated to a new server and had been down more than up for several days. Once it was back up and new members started arriving, the loss in traffic white the site was migrating had affected the advertising rates. It takes time for traffic to build again.

On May 4, 2016, just as everyone was in gear again, the administration said they would have to stop issuing points until enough traffic returned to generate enough income to start the earning process again. The administrator said those who had enough points to redeem would be paid. Many people were paid if they were eligible. But no one is earning points again yet.

Image photo courtesy of  Pixabay, text added on PicMonkey

What's Next for BlogJob Members?


Current members find themselves in a dilemma. Do they stay, and wait? Or do they stay and participate as usual, even without earning points? Or do they take their work and move it elsewhere? Almost everyone at BlogJob had once been on Bubblews and was wondering if BlogJob would also go under. Do you cash out and leave? Or stay and hope the site will come back and do all you can to help make that happen? Different members have chosen different paths.

I have six blogs on BlogJob that I worked hard on. I was planning to move more there from other sites. Now I'm not sure that's wise. Although those with BlogJob blogs are allowed to monetize them, it's not as easy as it is on a self-hosted site. An affiliate marketer will do better with a self-hosted site for reasons I explain here. It's also true that one depending on third-party hosting never knows when she will wake up one morning and discover the site is gone. I don't think BlogJob will close its doors without warning, since it has been upfront with us so far.

It seems some of the traffic loss was due to an attack from Romania, and that it has now been dealt with. The site is faster now. Hope is building that points will start being issued again soon. I believe it's too early to tell. Who knows? Maybe the very act of my posting this will get the ball rolling, as per Murphy's Law.

Most BlogJob members who are still posting in forums are taking an optimistic view, believing problems will be resolved and the giving of points will return. No one has had their point balance erased. Payout requests from those with enough points are being honored and paid. I don't think this is Bubblews II. People who monetize their blogs will still be able to earn independently of BlogJob points. They can still enjoy socializing with each other as they do on other sites for free. Many members are putting in more time on myLot, which most of them also belong to and which does pay for participation.

Hope Springs Eternal Mug
Hope Springs Eternal Mug
Browse more Boomspress Mugs

Like other BlogJob members, I sincerely hope the site will soon  be issuing points again. I think maybe those points should not be given as freely for actions like creating groups and making friends, since that rewards actions that are often abused on the site. I'm looking forward to the next act in this drama. I hope it all ends happily for the BlogJob members who depend on this site for income. I do believe the site owner will do all in his power to keep members informed and start letting them earn again. I believe his intentions are good. I hope he has the skills and the knowledge it takes to carry out those good intentions.

To see what is possible for BlogJob bloggers, please check out one of my blogs from those below.

Trees in My World
All Around California
The Sky is God's Canvas



Note: The author may receive a commission from purchases made using links found in this article.

10 comments:

  1. I really hate to hear that yet another writing platform on the internet is experiencing problems. As internet writers, we enjoy the online communities that those companies offer us. Every contributor on Review This has been through at least one of these major closures and it is always devastating. I sincerely hope for every writer on BlogJob that the owner / administration is able to find a financial balance that allows them to stay open. Sadly, sometimes skills and knowledge are not enough to keep a site going. I wish you and everyone on Blogjob, great success and many, many years of being a happy community again.

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    1. Thank you, Mouse. I'm personally fortunate that I don't have too much invested yet. I'm gambling that points will begin again and I can reach the amount I need to cash out at $50 or $100 instead of the $25 I could get if I cash out now. Everyone there is having to make decisions like this, as well as whether to invest any more time into blogging there. The more that is posted, the more likely the site will survive and start paying again. The more one posts, the more wasted time one risks.

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  2. An interesting review of this website, Blogjob, Barbara. I've read and followed a few blogs there, but didn't really know what it was all about. Hope it returns to what it was for you and the others who write there. It's hard when a site you depend on changes and/or disappears as has been frequent in the online world.

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    1. At least the administrator, like the Persona Paper administrator, is honest and letting us know what's happening. The Bubblews owners were deceptive until the very end.

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    2. At least the administrator, like the Persona Paper administrator, is honest and letting us know what's happening. The Bubblews owners were deceptive until the very end.

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  3. I'm glad that it seems you are keeping an optimistic attitude. I am sad to hear about another writing platform struggling. I hope it all straightens out and goes well.

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    1. I do hope things will improve for the site. I don't have to worry about my basic needs being met. Some from other countries need the income badly. Of course, an affiliate marketer can still make commissions, but many of these members can't get affiliate accounts.

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  4. So sorry to hear of the instability with such a popular writing site, Barbara. As you said, it's good that the site owner is being up front about the issues. With what so many have been through with writing sites in the past couple of years, certainly it seems wise not to put all those writing eggs in one basket and to keep copies of everything you write, just in case. Hopefully this story will have a happy ending, and soon.

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    1. I think all of us who started on Squidoo have learned to spread those eggs out into more baskets, and those who were on Bubblews should also have learned that lesson. That's why I advise people who can get affiliate and / or Adsense accounts to self-host.

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  5. Excellent article on the issues at BlogJob. I don't that it's another Bubblews II either. I think that it will come back better than ever, but it will take time. Like you said, at least the owner has been upfront about the issues and made changes accordingly. I'm still receiving plenty of traffic, and my sales have been good. Points or no points I plan on staying as long as the site is maintained.

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